THE TABLET v i Weekly N ew sp aper a n d R ev iew

DUM V O B IS GRATULAMUR AN IM O S E T IA M ADDIMUS UT IN IN C C E PT IS V E S T R IS CONSTANTER M ANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

Vol. 156. No. 4,706.

London, July 19, 1930.

Sixpence.

R EG IS TERED AT TIL* GENERAL P O S T O t E IC E AS A NEW SPAPER

Page

News and No t e s ......... 69 Dark Days ............................ 73 The Education Bill— and

After

Metropolitan Eulogius and the Schism in the Russian Church Abroad ................ 75 From The Tablet of Eighty

73

Years A g o ..................... 76 Coming Events ................ 76 Review s :

A Thomistic Problem . . . 76 Mediaeval Romance . . . 77

CONTENTS

Page

R eview s (G ontd.):

Miss Scott A g a in ................ 77 By Father P lus ................ 78 An Uncertain Sound . . . 78 Books Received ................ 78 New Books and Music . . . 79 Death of Bishop Bidwell 80 Catholic Education Notes . . . 82 The Tablet and Mr. Amery 83 Work for Emigrants . . . 84 Ch e s s ............................ . . . 84 Correspondence :

Rome (O ur Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................. 87

Page

E t Ce t e r a ...................... 89 At B le n h e im ...................... 90 Letters to the Ed it o r :

“ A Spade a Spade” . . . 91 Malta ......................... 93 E piscopal Engagements 93 Obituary ......................... 94 Orbis Terrarum:

England, Scotland and Wales ......................... 94 Ireland ...................... 96 Albania ......................... 96

Orbis Terrabum

Austria Ethiopia France India Italy Jamaica New Zealand Palestine Poland Portugal Catholic Seamen's

Page (Contd.) ;

................ 96 ................ 98 ................ 98 ................ 98

. . . 98 ................ 98 ................100 ............100 ............100 ...........100 Congress 100

Social and P ersonal . . . 100

*NOTANDA Cardinal Vincenzo Vannutelli : His Eminence’s last moments. A summary of the late Cardinal’s long and important career (p. 87).

Bishop Bidwell. Obituary tributes from the Cardinal Archbishop and the Government; and from the Editor mourning the loss of a Friend of The Tablet. The requiem at Westminster Cathedral (pp. 69, 80-82).

Unemployment grows worse. A Tablet leaderwriter begs for national seriousness. The Anglican Bishop of Durham on the “ British Lazzaroni ” (PP- 71, 73).

Catholic Schools. A speech by the Archbishop of Liverpool; an article by the Bishop of Pella; and some Tablet Notes (pp. 70, 73, 90).

Sir Augusto Bartolo fills nearly three columns of The Tablet with his rejoinder to “ A Spade a Spade.” And the Rev. Perceval Howell uses onethird of a column for a disclosure which should interest Sir Augusto (pp. 91, 93).

The Diaspora of Russian Orthodox Christians. Count Bennigsen’s survey (p. 75).

“ Chucking up ” big hats. A forgotten rubric (p. 72).

NEWS AND NOTES O NE more Friend of The Tablet has been taken from us. Manuel Bidwell, Bishop of Miletopolis, was always ready to give us his very precious time and the benefit of his legal mind. Only a few weeks ago, when he honoured our mid-day board as both guest and counsellor, Mgr. Bidwell seemed to be in unusually good health and spirits. He was fresh from an encounter with 125 Labour Members, who admired greatly his candid words on Catholic Schools. In diebus snis placuit Deo; and, remembering his rare combination of gifts, we may truly go on to say, non est inventus similis illi.

New Series. Vol. CXXIV. No. 4,105.

Although the Catholics of London are mainly a hard-working body, with little week-day leisure, there are many thousands of them who will be able to spare an hour or two next Monday morning, if they will make the effort. Thirty minutes before noon on that day (July 21) His Eminence Cardinal Bourne will enter his cathedral church of Westminster to preside at a Solemn Te Deum in thanksgiving for one hundred years of Belgian Independence. There are many reasons why British Catholics ought to welcome a little inconvenience, so as to give proof of their solidarity with our Belgian brethren. Nominally Protestant England has for near neighbours, to the East and to the West, two stoutly Catholic States. Twenty leagues from Holyhead, the quays of Dublin Bay are lively, many times a day, with the comings and goings of Irishmen and Englishmen. And, twenty leagues from Shakespeare’s Cliff, the jetties of Ostend welcome, a thousand times a year, shiploads of friendly Britons. No Protestant land lies so near, because Holland, so far as regular churchgoers are concerned, is now more Catholic than Protestant, and the same is probably true of Germany. It has been largely under Catholic statesmen, as well as under a Catholic King, that Belgium has risen to her highest glory. Her centenary as a free and sovereign State is indeed an occasion for British thanksgiving to the God of Nations.

Further, the unstinting generosity of Belgian idealism in 1914 and in the sickening years which followed would alone be a sufficient reason for our going to Westminster Cathedral next Monday morning. Memories are short, and human gratitude is not always durable. In talking with young people we have been pained to find that lads and lasses of twenty years or less rarely understand Great Britain’s inestimable obligation to little Belgium. It would indeed be a goodly sight if Westminster should find, next Monday, that many of our Catholic girls have given up their tennis to swell the throng of thanksgivers. The time is short, but there is enough of it left for putting our suggestion before those leisured