THE TABLET siWeekly N ew s p a p e r a n d R e v ie w

DUM V O B I S G RATULAM UR A N IM O S E T I AM AD D IU U S UT I N IN C C E P T IS V E S T R I S C O N ST AN TER M A N E A T IS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4, 1870.

V o l . 157. N o . 4,736. L o n d o n , F e b r u a r y 14, 1931.

S i x p e n c e .

R eg is tered at the General P ost Off ic e as a Newspaper

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New s and No t e s .................. 201 Disarmament, Limited . . . 205 Christ and the Critics . . . 206 Pontifical Court Club . .. 207 R e v ie w s :

Some Contemporary

Christology ................. 208 The Pound Sterling . . . 208 TJnheavenly Twins . . . 209 More Year B o o k s ................. 209 A Dangerous Experiment 210 Coming Events .................. 210 New Books and Music . . . 210 Books Received ................. 211

CONTENTS

Death of the Bishop of

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Clifton ............................ 212 Liverpool Cathedral . . . 212 Cambridge University and

Its Martyrs............................ 212 L e tters to the Ed it o r :

Lonely P a r is h e s .................214 Bird Lovers and Bird

F a n c i e r s ............................ 214 Correspondence :

(Rome, Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................217

From The Tablet of Ninety

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Years Ago .............. 218 E t Caster a ........................... 219 Catholic Education Notes ... 220 W i l l s ........................... 220 St. Werburgh, Patroness of

Chester ......................... 221 Ch e s s ........................................ 222 Or b i s T errarum :

England, Scotland and Wales .............................. 222 Ireland ............................223 Belgium ............................ 223 Canada ............................ 223

Or b i s T errarum ( Oontd.) :

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China ............................224 France ............................ 224 Germany ............................ 224 Holland ............................226 I t a l y ....................................... 226 New Zealand ................. 226 North America ................. 226 Rhodesia ............................ 228 Spain ............................ 228 Syria 228 Ob it u ary .............................. 228 E p is c o p a l E ngagements 228 So c ia l and P ersonal . . . 228

NOTANDA About a Roman article “ not written with a quill pluckt from an ostrich.” The actual limitations of Disarmament in Europe (p. 205).

Death of the Bishop of Clifton. An outline of his lordship’s career (p. 212).

A Jewish journalist on Marriage. Christian and Rabbinical ideas contrasted (p. 204).

The “ Orthodox ” persecution of Catholic Uniats in Athens. Will England’s Anglo-Orthodox leaders intervene? (p. 203).

A Dispute concerning the Disputes Bill. Its importance for Catholics (p. 201).

Episcopal administration by Chancery Judges’ Orders. The Archbishop of Canterbury as Executioner (p. 202).

To-morrow’s Lenten Pastorals. A reminder to heads of households (p. 201).

St. Werburgh, Patroness of Chester. The blessing of a shrine in her titular church in the city (p. 221).

Progress on behalf of the timber-slaves. A wellknown firm’s noble decision and a Foreign Secretary’s ignoble pusillanimity (p. 202).

NEWS AND NOTES I T is through her Episcopate— the Catholic Bishops in communion with the Holy Petrine See— that Ecclesia Docens works. For the ordinary instruction of the faithful, Catholic Bishops delegate their Teaching Office to the parish priests of the diocese. But on Quinquagesima Sunday it is their custom to guide their flocks by means of Lenten Letters or “ Pastorals.” Therefore it is the duty of a Catholic paterfamilias to arrange for the fullest possible representation of his household at the parish Mass to-morrow. There are servants and others— many, many others— who have never been present at the

N ew S e r ie s . Voi. CXXV. No. 4,135.

reading of a Lenten Pastoral, because such documents are rarely presented at the earlier and necessarily shorter Masses. Meals could be so simplified to-morrow as to allow of much larger than the usual congregations at the parish Mass. And we may be sure that those priests— if there be any left— who have hitherto read the Bishop’s Letter tamely and perfunctorily will take pains with this task when they are faced by an exceptional multitude of expectant hearers. The Bishop is a Right Reverend Father in God to both high and low, literate and illiterate, gentle and simple. He writes his Lenten Letter as truly to the kitchen-maids at the back of the nave as to the Pillars of the Parish in the front seats. So let us all receive his Pastoral Epistle as we would receive the Bishop himself.

Out of the Trades Disputes Bill there has arisen a Dispute which a lawyer friend of ours calls “ very pretty.” We would call it very ugly. The point at issue is this : “ If the Bill now before Parliament should become law in its present form, would a General Strike ‘ as in 1926 ’ be legal or illegal ? ” To this plain and enormously important question we are receiving from His Majesty’s Ministers a batch of answers which are not only varied, but contradictory. While this Dispute is of vast consequence to the whole nation, it has a special interest for Catholics. At the crucial moment in 1926, when other religious leaders were either faltering in their support of law and order or were encouraging the enemies of the State, Cardinal Bourne, wholly heedless of unpopularity and even of personal danger, spoke out unequivocally on the side of that Authority which is wielded by mortal men only as the stewards of Almighty God. If History should repeat itself in the sorry terms of 1926, the repetition would include another condemnation by our Catholic leaders. Therefore, we say again that this Disputes Bill Dispute is of special interest to Catholics. There is nothing which we, as loyal subjects, desire less than to be in conflict with the laws of the realm : but when laws diverge from eternal principles of justice Catholics cannot oblige the law-givers by diverging