The Tablet, December 6, 1930.

WITH LITERARY SUPPLEMENT: SIXTY-FOUR PAGES.

THE TABLET y l Weekly Newspaper and Review DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMU S UT IN INCCEPTIS V E STR IS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4, 1870.

Vol. 156 . No. 4 ,726. L o n don, D ecem ber 6 , 1930.

S ix p e n c e .

Registered at the Gshekal P ost Offic e A8 a Newspape»

CONTENTS

Page

Page

News and Notes . .. .. 729 In the West Riding

Moscow’s Best Friend .. 733 From The Tablet of Eighty The Nun’s P r iest’s Tale . .. 733 Years A g o ................ 740 Sheridan’s “ Critic ’ at Advent P astorals: Clarendon Square 740 Westminster .. 734 Ch e s s ........................... 741

Birmingham

Menevia

Cardiff ......................... .. 735 E t CiETERA..............

.. 736

.. 736 Correspondence :

740

742

Catholic Education Notes . .. 738

The C.C.I.R............................ .. 739

Rome (O ur Own Correspondent s Weekly Letter from) ..............

745

Coming E vents ................ Page 746 Obituary ............................ 747 E piscopal E ngagements 747

Orbis Terrarum:

England, Scotland and Wales ............................ 748 Ireland ............................ 749 Canada ............................ 749 Channel Islands . .. !!! 750 China ............................ 750

Page

Orbis Terrarum (Oontd.) :

Fiji ............................................750 France ................................7 50 Germany ................................750 I t a l y ................................... 750 Poland ................................752 Spain .................................752 Letters to the E ditor :

Humane Slaughter . . . 752 Another W ar ................... 752 An Old Scots P a rish . . . 753 Social and P ersonal . . . 756

NOTANDA In a double number of The Tablet, many topics are discussed. A Literary Supplement of two-andthirty pages (pp. 761-792).

The episcopal silver jubilee of the Bishop of Leeds. Last Sunday’s demonstration in the Victoria Hall (p. 740).

Russia. Mr. Sabline acknowledges the work of the Sovereign Pontiff (p. 732). A respectful hint to the colleagues of Mr. Henderson (p. 733).

An important judgment in the Court of Appeal. The case of Baby Joan (p. 732).

“ Bilking ” the author. An ethico-literarv article by a Tablet leader-writer (p. 762).

Old Russia’s faith in the Immaculate Conception. Some researches into seventeenth-century writings (p. 731).

Disestablishment. The Anglican Bishop of Durham on a deadlock which is “ complete, scandalous and laughable ” (p. 730).

More about the Balkanic League. The attitude of the Greater Powers (p. 729).

Catholic progress in Lochaber. An illustrated article on past achievements and present intentions at Fort William (pp. 753-6).

NEWS AND NOTES XTOT long ago, News and Notes contained an 1 N interim appreciation of the new Balkanic Union’s conference in Athens. Several readers ask us to write more about it.

Nearly a hundred representative men—to be precise, there were ninety-eight—assembled in the Hellenic capital at the beginning of October and were in consulation for eight days. Several foreign newspapers which we have examined in this connection describe the ninety-eight consultants as " delegates,” but this is a word often misused, both at home and abroad. Whether various organizations

N ew S e r ie s . Vol. CXXIV. No. 4,125.

in the Balkan countries did or did not delegate leading members to speak for them in Athens we cannot say, but we can and do say that nobody attended the Conference officially on behalf of any Balkan Government. The respective Governments of the Balkan Kingdoms and Republics sent “ observers ” to the sessions, just as Washington sends observers to Geneva, but they did not send delegates, and they are in no way bound by the resolutions of the Conference. Let us hasten to add, however, that all the Governments, not excepting Turkey, look on the Balkanic League or Union with favour. M. Venizelos, who was at first hostile to this movement, is now a firm believer in its programme and methods.

Among the practical schemes discussed in Athens were the Unification of Laws ; a Balkanic Cultural E n ten te ; Economic Co-operation; and the Improvement of Roads, Railways and Air-routes. The Conference even went so far as to say that, in their contacts with non-Balkan Powers, there might be a rapprochement politique of all the Balkan peoples. A modem Secretariat is to be established ; and the next Conference will be held in Constantinople.

As the participating countries—Albania, Bulgaria, Greece, Roumania, Turkey and Yugoslavia—already have political entanglements or commitments with States outside the proposed League or Union, some writers are hinting that the Great Powers will quietly stop the movement from going much further. France, for example, has carefully built up a position of prestige in Yugoslavia and may not be in a hurry to see it swept away in a spate of Pan-Balkanism. Italy is powerful both in Greece and in Bulgaria, and is still more powerful in Albania. Will Signor Mussolini view the rise of Balkanism with indifference ? Great Britain’s considerable influence in Greece would suffer if a Pan-Balkanic League became very strong. Most certain of all, Moscow will not want to see Turkey gravitate towards a mainly Christian centre.