THE TABLET siW'eekly N ew s p a p e r and Review

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS V E S TR IS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Floliness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4, 1870.

Vol. 156. No. 4,722. London, November 8, 1930.

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Registered at the General P ost Office as a Newspaper

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News and No t e s ................. 601 Miss Perkins ................. 605 Dr. Coulton’s Reply . . . 606 From The Tablet of Eighty

Years A g o ............................ 607 Episcopal Engagements 607 R eview s :

The Polish Corridor . . . 608 The Splendour and Misery of Victorianism . . . 608 Doing Justice to Josephus 608 Arthur in Italian Litera­

ture ............................ 609 An Ambassador of Christ 609 The Coolidge Boom . . . 610

CONTENTS

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New Books and Music ... 610 Books Received ................. 612 Ch e s s .......................................612 The Education Question and

How to Solve I t ................. 613 St. Mary’s Training College,

Strawberry H i l l ................. 614 Catholic Education Notes . . . 614 Triduum of the English Martyrs ............................ 615 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 617

Letters to the Ed it o r :

Edward M a r t y n ................. 619 Degrees in Catholic

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Philosophy ................. 619 The Committee is Grateful 619 Et Ca s t e r a ............................ 620 Obituary ............................ 621 Attempt to Fire a Church 621 Coming Events ................. 622 St. Joan’s Quincentenary 622 W i l l ....................................... 622 Orbis Terrarum :

England, Scotland and Wales ............................ 622 Ireland ............................ 623

Orbis Tebearum ( Oontd.) :

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Argentina .............. 623 Belgium .............. 623 Ceylon .............. 623 China .............. 624 Czechoslovakia 624 France .............. 624 Germany .............. 626 I n d i a ......................... 626 I t a l y ......................... 628 Palestine .............. 628 Roumania .............. 628 Spain .............. 628 Southampton’s Moth er

Church .............. 628 So c ia l and P ersonal 628

NOTANDA Home Politics : their confusion and sterility. A Tablet Note-writer pleads that the compilers o f K ing’s Speeches shall show more respect fo r His Majesty (p. 601).

Paternal words fo r Miss Polly Perkins, o f Paddington Green and many other addresses (p. 605).

Noteworthy conversions in South India. Some old “ News and N o t e s ” recalled (pp. 602, 626).

Dr. G. G. Coulton’s reply to The Tablet, and The Tablet’s few words to Dr. Coulton (p. 606).

Catholics in Public Life. A new Note on an old text (p. 604).

The English Martyrs. The Cardinal Archbishop’s instructions fo r the solemn Triduum in the Westminster diocese (p. 615).

The Education question. Thoughts fo r the Government in a speech by the Archbishop o f Birmingham (p. 613). The Tablet’s Educational Correspondent deals further with Sir Charles Trevelyan’s Bill, and offers, in form , a suggested letter from Catholic electors to their local Members (p. 614).

A timely discovery in a Derbyshire church. What one visitor left, and another found (p. 621).

NEWS AND NOTES A LTHOUGH we admit that constitutional reasons for the practice are strong, we often wish that the legislative programme of a Party Government at the beginning of a new Session could be put forward otherwise than in the form o f a Speech from the Throne. After last week’s ceremony, more than one loyal and thoughtful citizen expressed to us his regret that the part played by His Majesty at the opening o f Parliament had not been confined to a Gracious Speech declaring the Session open and praying for the help of Almighty God in the forthcoming deliberations. The King is the father of his people, deeply

N ew S eries. Vol. CXXIV. No. 4,121.

and affectionately solicitous for their welfare. Therefore it is unjust to put him in the light of a ruler who has no adequate measures to propose for the relief of the miseries which weigh heavily on millions of his subjects. We repeat, however, that wc see the force of arguments for retaining the present custom. Although ours is a Limited and not an Absolute Monarchy, we must not consent to the notion that the Crown is little more than ornamental. The King does not put the who., task and responsibility of good government clean out o f his own hands when he sends for a First Minister and entrusts him with the choice of a Ministry. By associating the Sovereign with a legislative programme we remind all concerned that the Monarch is not a nonentity. The maintenance, however, o f this old and reasonable constitutional practice lays upon Ministers the duty of protecting the King’s good name. It has been unpleasant during the last ten days to hear our greater statesmen publicly talking about “ this hopeless King’s Speech ” and so on. Further, Ministers ought not to put in the mouth of His Majesty promises which are not likely to be fulfilled. Many times in living memory it has happened that the King has been made to utter forecasts o f legislation on a scale of unrealisable amplitude, with the result that members of the Opposition have been able, at the close of the Session, to ask in taunting tones “ Where are the measures which were promised in the King’s Speech ? ”

Out of this week’s debate on Unemployment, no solid comfort has come to anybody. The Government remains in office because no Party other than the Labour Party is able to accept the succession. Nor is any Party ready for a General Election. Conservatism’s deep divisions on tariff policies give satisfaction to Liberalism and L a b ou r ; but members of these two Parties are chastened in their rejoicing by the knowledge that there are divisions in their own ranks also. Last Tuesday night, the leadership of Mr. Lloyd George was