THE TABLET N.Weekly N ew sp a p e r a n d R ev iew DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS V E S TR IS CONSTANTER MANE ATI S

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4, 1870.

Vol. 156. No. 4,723. London, November 15, 1930.

Sixpence.

R e g i stkp.su a t t h e G i n e b a l P o s t O f f i c e a s a N e w s p a p e b

Page I

New s and No t e s ................... 633 “ Adversity” Hoover . . . 637 The Commercial Conscience 638 The Holy Father’s Day :

An Interim Report . . . 639 R e v i e w s :

A Great Work ................. 640 Religion and Science . . . 640 Five Canonical Disserta­

tions ............................ 641 God’s Acre .............. 642 1 Our Great-Grandfathers’

Reading ......................... 642 I

CONTENTS

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New Books and Music . . . 642 Books Received ................. 644 Dr. Coulton Once More 644 From The Tablet of Eighty

Years Ago

W i l l s ............................... 645 University of London

645

Catholic Society ................. 646 The Catholic Evidence Cam­

paign

Ch e s s ............................... 647

646

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Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 649 Father Davis, S.J., on

Birth Control ................. 651 E t C/e t e r a ...............................6 52 Catholic Education Notes . . . 653 Ob it u ary ............................ 654 Sir John Gilbert on the

Education Bill ................. 655 Coming E vents ...................655 Orb 1s T err arum :

England, Scotland and Wales ............................ 655

Okbis T errarum ( Oontd.) :

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Ireland ............................ 656 Brazil ............................658 France ............................ 658 Germany . . . . . . . . . 658 Italy 658 Japan ............................ 659 Peru 659 Portugal ............................ 660 Spain ............................ 660 U.S.A............................... 660 West Africa .............. 660 The Conference on India 660 E p is c o p a l Engagements 660 So c ia l and P ersonal . . . 660

NOTANDA Prayers for the Indian Round Table Conference. Why they must be “ big ” prayers (p. 633).

President H oover’s hard luck. A Tablet prophecy recalled (p. 637).

Austria’ s General Election. H ow anti-Marxianism can do its work without a Fascist or a dictatorial coup (p. 633).

“ Fourteen in Family.” Slowly but surely M. Joseph Turmel comes to his account (p. 636).

Lourdes. Dom Francis Izard’s reminder that Spontaneity and Instantaneity are different things (p. 635).

Birth Prevention. A useful letter from Father Henry Davis, S.J. (p. 651).

Dr. Coulton. The end o f one more chapter in his L ife and Times (p. 644).

Why the “ Iron Virgin o f Nuremberg ” deserves to be, but is not in fact, old iron. A story o f 1867 (p. 652).

The Soviet’s economic offensive. Some instructive facts and figures as to dumpings from the antiGod front (p. 638).

A very wonderful piece o f progress. The growth o f the Catholic Evidence Guilds (p. 646).

NEWS AND NOTES O UR leaders have asked for the prayers of Catholics in aid of the Round Table Conference concerning India which was opened by His Majesty in person last Wednesday. This is a big thing, requiring big prayers. Some of us may be in danger of pettiness. For example, we may be tempted to pray for a happy and successful Round Table Conference mainly so as to be rid of a worry. But India is more than a worry. It is a problem. And it is a magnificent responsibility, resting grandly and heavily on our British race. What we have to pray for is not merely the swift and equable settlement of disputes which vex our peace and

New Series. Vol. CXXIV. No. 4,122.

derange British trade, but for a solution which will bring the truest happiness to the greatest number. The people of India are one-sixth of the whole human race, for which our Divine Redeemer died. Prayers for so vast a multitude must be on the big scale of adveniat regnum tuum. It will be appropriate, while the delegates are round their Table, to extend our daily prayer for Russia by a prayer for India.

Armistice Day has been solemnly observed for the twelfth time. The only jarring notes have been struck by men and women who preach harmony. These trying censors of our national life are demanding that there shall not again be a Two Minutes Silence ; and some of them are saying openly that the time has come for the Great War to be forgotten. We were glad to hear the Prince of Wales speaking in the contrary sense on Armistice Night. Where the Oblivionists go wrong is in their notion that Remembrance means Revengeful Resentment. To forgive the slayers and to remember the slain are not inconsistent processes of British minds and hearts. Catholics especially should wish the Silence to continue. During the Two Minutes, millions of men and women who do not admit it into their minds at any other time during the year have the good and wholesome thought of praying, more or less vaguely, for the dead. That these moments of love for the fallen must be mused on a basso ostinato of hate for the Germans is such a dreadful notion that, if they do not renounce it, our censors will have to be censured in the name of charity.

As Austria’s ten-year-old Constitution provides quadriennial Parliaments, and as only two and forty months have passed since the last National Council was chosen, a General Election could have been postponed until next Easter. Austria’s worried statesmen, however, hoped that an appeal to the country might clarify a confused situation ; and so the appeal was made. The result is disappointing. The Marxian Socialists, who call themselves Social