TH E TABLET A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER AND REVIEW

ESTABLISHED 1840 REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER

VOL. 169 No. 5062

LONDON MAY 15th, 1937

SIXPENCE

PRINCIPAL CONTENTS

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK

THE VATICAN AND THE FOREIGN OFFICE ; ITALY IN THE ENGLISH PRESS ; ITALO-BRITISH RELATIONS ; THE IRISH FREE STATE AND THE IMPERIAL CONFERENCE ; THE DOMINIONS AND GREAT BRITAIN’S FOREIGN POLICY ; FRENCH LABOUR TROUBLES ; THE MARRIAGE BILL ; NOBLEMEN ON STRIKE ; THE HOLY LAND IN THE HONOURS LIST THE ANCIENT LIGHTS ......................... O LORD, SAVE THE KING

By MGR. R. A. KNOX WHITSUNTIDE.................................................

By R. H. J . STEUART, S.J. THE AUGUSTINIANS AND SPANISH

EDUCATION................................................. By PROFESSOR E. ALLISON PEERS THE UNPOPULAR FRONT .........................

VI. Conclusion By ARNOLD LUNN

693

696 697 698

699 701

SPANISH LETTER ..................................... VIENNA LETTER ..................................... ROME LETTER ..................................... THE CHURCH ABROAD ......................... BOOKS OF THE WEEK .........................

A HISTORY OF ENGLAND ; BROTHER PETROC’S RETURN ; THE DESTINY OF FRANCE ; ARISTOTLE’S PHYSICS ; THE HOLY TRINITY ; IDEAL MOTHERHOOD ; PURCELL ; INTRODUCTORY LECTURE, 1892 ; CATHOLIC PERIODICALS TOWN AND COUNTRY ......................... LETTERS TO THE EDITOR......................... THE CORONATION AT LIVERPOOL O B IT U A R IE S .................................................

702 703 704 706 708

714 715 717 719

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK The Vatican and the Foreign Office

The attendance of Cardinal Pacelli at the Coronation Mass in the English College in Rome, on Wednesday, was a further gesture of good-will towards this country on the part of the Holy Father. One of Mgr. Pizzardo’s first engagements on arriving in London at the beginning of the week was a talk with Mr. Eden. It is not diplomatic custom to do more than announce the fact when these conversations take place, but it is no secret that the meeting left a very happy impression. Mgr. Pizzardo was able to hear from the lips of the man chiefly charged with responsibility, how firmly British policy is seeking to appease and not to accentuate the present rivalries in Europe. While so much tendencious propaganda is attempting to suggest that Great Britain is ranged in a bloc with France and Russia, both in Spain and Central Europe, the independence of this country, and its consciousness that in its own interests and in those of Europe it must stand apart, cannot be too clearly reaffirmed. Thus the independence of Austria is something which Great Britain whole-heartedly desires to see maintained, and although the journals of the Left may continue to dislike Dr. Schuschnigg as they disliked Dr. Dollfuss, and may call the Fatherland Front in Austria “ clerico-Fascism, ” the present regime enjoys the full support of this country. We are particularly glad that Mgr. Pizzardo will be able to take back to Rome some personal knowledge of Mr. Eden, who is constantly misrepresented in the Italian Press as inspired both by an overweening personal ambition, and by a particular rancour against Italy. It is much to Mr. Eden’s credit that in the year and a half of his tenure of the Foreign Office he has succeeded in being a great disappointment to the fire-eating progressives, who are beginning to class him with Sir John Simon as unable to dominate his department, and as miserably over-cautious and lukewarm in attempting to revive the Geneva system. Italy in the English Press

The regrettable decision of Signor Mussolini to recall all Italian newspaper correspondents in London, and to exclude the English Press, with the exceptions of the Daily Mail, the Evening News and the Observer, from Italy, is something which has not happened before. Such an action draws attention to the new importance of the Press in improving or injuring relations between foreign countries, but the comments with which those newspapers principally responsible for the bad feeling between Great Britain and Italy greet the Italian action, show singularly little realization of the importance of good manners in this field. For month after month, the readers of the Daily Herald and the News Chronicle have had Italy presented to them as a bullying, treacherous and cowardly power. The versions of the fighting put out from Madrid and Valencia are accepted gratefully at their face value, and displayed in large headlines. Diplomatic correspondents conjecture freely with a strong bias in favour of the worst interpretation which can be based on the stories that reach them, and at the end of it all, Mr. Vernon Bartlett, under the heading “ Mussolini in a Temper,” wonders if there is now beginning a new rivalry “ which has certainly not been desired or provoked in Great Britain.” We wonder if Mr. Vernon Bartlett, or his chief, Sir Walter Layton, ever pause to consider that all their busy-ness for peace these last two years has had for its principal result the wanton destruction of the old and important friendship between this country and Italy. If the damage proves permanent, it is a major fact in Europe. It may prove that we have driven Italy into alliance with Germany at the very moment when such an alliance will destroy the attempts to prevent the formation of two great rival camps in Europe. Italo-British Relations

We must recognise that this estrangement was not sought or expected by the Italians. Two years ago, while their relations with the French and the Germans were, for different reasons, rather strained, there was one country with whom they had no differences. Bewilderment turned to rage when they discovered that Italy