AUTOBIOGRAPHY of G. K. CHESTERTON —continued.

THE TABLET A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER AND REVIEW

ESTABLISHED 1840 REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER

VOL. 168 No. 5031

LONDON OCTOBER 10th, 1936

SIXPENCE

PRINCIPAL CONTENTS

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK

MADRID IN EDINBURGH — NON-INTERVENTION — REARMAMENT—RUSSIA AT GENEVA — THE NEW ATTITUDE TO MONEY—FORMS OF INTERNATIONAL

TRADE

LEADING ARTICLES ........................ 476

473 NEW YORK LETTER..................................................... 483

THE CHURCH ABROAD ........................ 484

ON ‘LUNATIC NATIONALISM’

By T. S. GREGORY

486

DOMINUS ILLUMINATIO MEA—THE CHURCH AND FORMS OF GOVERNMENT—PUBLIC SUPPORT

RELIGION IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION,

AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY, V I ........................ 489

By G. K. CHESTERTON

TV .......................................................... 477 BOOKS OF THE WEEK ........................ 494 THE SPANISH TRAGEDY—SIR JOSIAH STAMP— By CHRISTOPHER DAWSON WITHIN THAT CITY—TORRINGTON DAIRIES CATHOLIC ACTION IN SPAIN . . 479 O B IT U A R IE S ............................................... 498

By H. L. FRIEND

THE BISHOP OF HEXHAM, etc.

THE PILGRIMAGE OF GRACE . . 481 CHESS AND CROSSWORD........................ 502 By DAVID MATHEW ROME LETTER .................................... 482 THE CALENDAR .................................... 504

T H E WORLD WEEK BY WEEK Madrid at Edinburgh

There was great, but not unexpected effrontery in the special appeal which the Spanish delegate, Señora de Palencia, addressed to the Catholics of these islands in her speech at the Labour Party Congress on Wednesday. She arrived in the company of Señor de Asua, a man who was introduced to the assembled delegates as one of the makers of the Constitution of 1931. That Constitution truncated the activities of the Catholic Church in Spain in every direction, stopping the small stipends which the State had paid in compensation for Church lands which had been confiscated and sold. It was the purpose of the Constitution and the laws that followed it to deprive the Church of all influence in the national life. Thus the law of June, 1933, forbade all priests or religious to teach, or to conduct agricultural or industrial enterprises, and only the liberty of worship remained. These laws were accompanied by a similar spirit in the administration. To be a priest was considered as ipso facto a bar to any educational appointment in the universities.

The Church attaches so great importance to civil order, that even so hostile a regime was accepted, and Catholic activity took the form of constitutional opposition, and a group of Catholic parties sat in the Cortes, opposing these laws, but accepting them when they were passed. The two Spanish envoys in Edinburgh had a simple task with the audience before them. They had only to talk the language of Liberal democracy to arouse a storm of indignation that people so wellmeaning, and so like their audience, should be threatened with defeat at the hands of generals. The special appeal to the Catholics of this country to look on the civil war in Spain as similar to a General Election in England, with Catholics supporting both the Conservative and Labour Parties, was an important part of the strategy which seeks to enlist the Labour movement on the side of the forces of the Left in Spain. Catholics form a considerable percentage of the Labour Party, and in a great many northern constituencies, they are numerous enough to make all the difference in an election. The Labour Party has to take account of the Catholic vote in framing its education policies, and it is equally concerned not to waste an electoral asset by needlessly antagonising religious convictions in the international field. The Rejection of Communist Affiliation

The appearance of the Spanish delegates followed immediately on the vote by which, by a million and three-quarter votes to half-a-million, the request of the Communist Party for affiliation with the Labour Party was turned down. No bodies in England have had more first-hand experience of Communist hostility than the Trade Unions and the Parliamentary Labour Party, and there is no doubt that the sustained vilification with which they are assailed in the Daily Worker, for example, while it loses them some support, also underlines their claim to be considered as essentially moderate and reasonable groups. As far as domestic politics are concerned, the line of the Trade Unions, and of the Labour Party, is now clearly marked out ; they hope to make their electoral gains at the expense of the still surviving but very shrunken Liberal party, and by reassuring the great mass of lower middle class non-political voters who are easily scared for the fate of their savings and small pieces of property.