July 11, 1936

THE TABLET A Weekly Newspaper and Review V ol. 168. No. 5018. L o n d o n , J uly i i , 1936

S ix pence

R eg is t e r e d at th e General P ost Of f i c e as a New s p a p e r .

PRINCIPAL

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK

Danzig, A rab N ationalism, Labour and R ecruiting, O ld D iplomacy and N ew . . . 33 CATHOLIC USES FOR THE F I L M ............ 36 THE LORDLY UN IC O RN ................................ 36 IMPRESSIONS OF AUSTRIA AND HUN­ GARY TO-DAY ......................................... 37

P age

(B y E. Q uinn) THE LEGION OF DECENCY ...................... 39 (B y Gyles I sham) JEW ISH SURNAMES......................................... 40

(B y G. Massoutie) LONDON LETTER ............ 42 PARIS L E T T E R ................................................... 42 ROME L E T T E R ................................................... 43

CONTENTS

THE NEW BOOKS

L eft W ings O ver E urope, T he O xford E lizabeth, Cardinal Manning .............. 44 THE NEW ENCYCLICAL ON THE

CINEMA:— ( F ull and U nabridged T ranslation of the

L atin T ext) .......................................................... 49 THE CHURCH IN THE WORLD :—

P alestine, China, T he Congo, Madagascar 53 SOUTHWARK RESCUE SOCIETY ............ 55 CHESS, CROSSWORD ................................ 56 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ...................... 57 APOSTOLATE OF THE COUNTRYSIDE ... 62 THE CALENDAR ......................................... 63

P ag e

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK

GERMANS AND POLES IN DANZIG The Free City of Danzig was separated from Germany by the Treaty of Versailles in the interests of the economic life of Poland. Poland has no natural outlet to the sea, and so the Polish Corridor dividing East Prussia from the rest of Prussia runs to the Baltic at Danzig. The old Free City was placed directly under a High Commissioner appointed by the League of Nations, and his main business is to see that the rights guaranteed to Poland are maintained. H err Greiser, who created the incident at Geneva, is the President of the Danzig Senate. Among the German population the Nazi Party are not a majority, but they are much the most important single group. They dislike Mr. Lester, the Irishman who holds the High Commissionership, for what they call his inter­ ference in the internal politics of Danzig.

No judgment on the future of Danzig is very valuable unless it recognises that the special status of the City seems to all Germans an infringement of German sovereignty in German territory. The recovery of Danzig undoubtedly figures in the list of treaty provisions which one by one the growing strength of Germany is enabling Hitler to bring about. Changes that were dictated by force in 1919 are being undone in the 1930’s because Germany can no longer be compelled to acquiesce in them. We have grown for so long accustomed to a Europe in which England and France decide what should be done that there is still a sense of outrage when things are done without or against our initiative. But it ought to be recognised that it is the manner rather than the matter of German diplomacy that can fairly be called provocative. The réintroduction of conscription into Germany, the rearmament

N ew S er ies. Vol. CXXXVI. No. 4417.

of the Rhineland, and now the studied rudeness to which the League’s representative in Danzig is subjected, are all actions aggressive in the way they are done but not aggressive in the substance of what they strive to bring about. In football metaphor, the ball is still in the German half of the field.

Relations at present are close between Germany and Poland. Colonel Beck, the Polish Foreign Minister, is the subject of incessant attack, partly for his policy and partly because he is not protected by Masonic membership, and is anathema to the internationalists so strongly entrenched at Geneva. The special flavour of that internationalism, its largely Judaic character, is something which is immediately felt in Geneva itself. There is a very high proportion of Jewish Liberals in the journalistic world that has grown up round the League of Nations, and this fact lay behind the insulting gesture with which H err Greiser capped his truculent speech to the assembly itself. The only conceivable future for the institution at Geneva which will be valuable for mankind will be one in which its present character and style are profoundly modified by the return of Germany and the renewed activity of Italy.

The Danzig question arises directly out of the partial character which the League has now assumed. Germans who can quite recognise the need for a special arrangement with Poland cannot endure the notion of tutelage at the hands of people for whom they feel no particular respect. The Poles, with their own money and at great effort, have built their own port at Gdynia by Danzig, but Gdynia would be valueless against a hostile Danzig, and the economic outlet through Danzig