June 20, 1936

THE TABLET A Weekly Newspaper and Review

V ol. 167. No. 5015.

L ondon, J une 20, 1936 Registered at the General, P ost Office as a Newsi' apeb.

Sixpence

PRINCIPAL

THE REPUBLICAN CHOICE, THE BELGIAN

Page

STRIKES, THE END OF SANCTIONS ... 777 THE DEATH OF MR. G. K. CHESTERTON ... 779 PORTRAIT OF G. K. C.......................................... 781 GILBERT CHESTERTON:—

By Hilaire Belloc, Alfred Noyes, the Abbot of Buckfast, C. C. Martindale, S.J., Sir Henry Slesser, T. S. Eliot.............................. 782 THE FUNERAL ................................................ 785 MODERNISATION AT THE VATICAN............ 786 CATHOLIC LIFE IN FRENCH UNIVERSITIES 787 THE MOYS OF ANNAM....................................... 788

CONTENTS

ROME LETTER ................................................ 789 THE CHURCH IN THE WORLD: —

Germany, Canada, India ................... 790 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR :—

Page

Catholic Novelists, St. Columba, Catholic Psychological Society .............................. 791 THE NEW BOOKS :—

The A rk and the Dove, L ions and Missionaries, St. John V ianney, Maps, etc............... 792 THE CONVERTS’ AID SOCIETY .................... ~798 THE APOSTOLATE OF THE COUNTRYSIDE 802

WEEK BY WEEK r T HE death o f Mr. G. K. Chesterton has come A as a heavy blow to the Catholics o f Great Britain, who have suffered a number o f serious losses in the past three years. Much o f this number o f The Tablet is devoted to his memory and to an appraisal o f his influence.

THE REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE The Republican Convention at Cleveland has made a good beginning for the Presidential campaign. It does not expect to win this November, but it hopes to re-establish the severely discredited Republican Party as an attractive alternative to the Democrats in 1940. A lfred Landon, the Governor o f Kansas, is a man o f forty-eight, a good mixer, self-made, and a living proof that even in so monopolistic field as o il,it is still possible for the small man to make a satisfactory fortune. Governor Landon was selected by Mr. Hearst last summer as being o f Presidential timbre. Four years in the wilderness and their failure to make any serious indentations on President Roosevelt’s shield have convinced the strategists o f the Republican Party that their best chance lies in looking to the future, putting the Grand Old Party before the American Republic, not as a Party resting on traditional dogmas and established record, but as a new Party for the new age. One important wing, headed by Senator Borah, has accepted much that is fundamental in President Roosevelt’s reconstruction, and this wing has to be maintained in the Party. But Republicans are pre-eminently the Party o f big business whose heyday ran from 1920 till the crash in 1929. They still hope to see a restoration o f the old conditions, but they know how' unwise it would be publicly to declare for a return to the view o f Government which prevailed in the days o f Coolidge and Hoover.

New Series. Vol. CXXXV. No. 4414.

For good or ill the Federal Government is the most important instrument fo r social change in the United States. In fields so different as monetary policy and the prevention o f criminal violence, more and not less Federal control is the accepted line o f advance to-day. It is significant that Governor Landon has already declared himself as prepared, if need be, to modify the Constitution to secure social legislation. The attempt to represent the Constitution as an Ark o f the Covenant not to be touched on any account is no longer an electoral asset. The Republican platform is relieved o f any embarrassment on the score o f the veterans’ bonus, for the bonus has just been paid. It has been paid to the tune o f £380,000,000 in bonds distributed among three and a half million o f the veterans o f the Great War. The great majority o f these veterans had only a few months o f army service.1 The great majority o f them never saw Europe, but persistent lobbying and tenacity in face o f Presidential vetoes has secured for them, eighteen years after the war ended, this comfortable windfall. President Roosevelt has seen this Bill passed a second time over his veto, and must draw consolation that its passage has strengthened the prospects o f a great many Democratic Congress men.

It is not intended that veterans’ bonuses shall happen again, for the Americans do not mean to take part in any future wars in Europe. The Republican platform, remembering the triumph o f 1920, is very outspoken about its adherence to the traditional foreign policy o f America. “ W e pledge that America shall not become a member o f the League o f Nations nor o f the world court, nor shall America take on any entangling alliances in foreign affairs.” Every step is to be taken to collect the war debts due to the United States. Much o f the rest o f the Republican policy is windowdressing to prevent the President from pointing to a dreary absence o f constructive alternatives to his