June 13, 1930

THE TABLET

A Weekly Newspaper and Review

V ol. 167 . N o . 5014 .

L o n d o n , J une 13 , 1936 R eg is tered at the General P o st Off ic e a s a New s pape r .

Sixpence

PRINCIPAL

CONTENTS

Page

BRITISH FOREIGN POLICY, AFRICA, AUS­

TRALIA, THE NEW MERCANTILISM, THE REVISION OF THE LEAGUE ... 741 PASSIVE CATHOLICS ......................................... 745 THE AIMS OF PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT (II) 745

Christopher Hollis

SAINTS ON THE SPANISH STAGE ............ 747

J. Fitzmaurice-Kelly

THIS YOUTH R A C K E T ......................................... 749

Peter Lunn

POLISH ART IN LONDON ............................... 751 THE FRENCH STRIKES ............................... 752

Page

IRISH LETTER ................................................... 753 ITALY AND THE LEAGUE; A ROMAN V IEW 754 CATHOLIC SCHOOLS IN THE THIRD REICH 756 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ............................... 758 THE NEW BOOKS:—

Rasi-id all’s “ Mediaeval Universities’’ ; The Movies; Doctrines of Grace; Francois Mauriac, etc............................................................ 760 THE APOSTOLATE OF THE COUNTRYSIDE 769 THE ARCHBISHOP OF WESTMINSTER’S

TRINITY PASTORAL ................................ 770

WEEK BY WEEK

THE DOMINIONS AND FOREIGN POLICY Q I S C U S S I O N S are now going on in London at which the whole o f British foreign policy is under anxious scrutiny. Mr. Pirow, the South A frica n Minister o f Defence, and Dr. Earle Page, the Deputy Prime Minister o f Australia, and Mr. R. G. Menzies, the Attorney-General, who are in London, represent the two great Dominions most vitally concerned with British policy. A n Imperial Conference is due next year, and the conversations are the prelude to much interchange o f opinion before then. The foreign policy o f the Commonwealth is determined by Great Britain, and no way o f sharing responsibility has been found better than the present method o f close communication. The Dominions are told everything, even at the risk o f leakages in one or two capitals, because there is no escape from the truth that, sovereign nations though they be, their fortunes are vitally affected by decisions which only the Imperial Government can take. The influence o f the Dominions since the W ar has been against precise commitments in Europe, for which their populations would be altogether unwilling to fight. Locarno was a specific commitment o f Great Britain. One o f the advantages o f the League o f Nations has been to provide a framework within which Great Britain and the Dominions could avoid probing to the bottom the difficulties which the Imperial constitution presents fo r the control and unification o f foreign policy.

The Chanak episode in 1922, which led to the fall o f the L loyd George Government, follow ing on the appeals which Mr. Churchill sent to the Dominions for their help against Turkey, brought out the difficulty which faces democratic statesmen New Series. Vol. CXXXV. No. 4413.

in the Dominions. They are expected to keep in close touch with Great Britain, but they would not be forgiven if they involved their people in war thousands o f miles away. Unfortunately the League generalities which enjoyed such a good innings for the first sixteen years follow ing 1919 have now outlived their usefulness and the new stocktaking which is going on is forcing the Dominions, no less than the European countries, to think out what their real interests are and for what actual objectives they are prepared, i f need be, to fight.

GROWING IMPORTANCE OF SOUTH AFRICA Mr. Pirow, a young statesman in the forties, and a very probable successor to the Premiership, represents a part o f the Empire particularly affected by the Italian conquest o f Abyssinia. It had long been known that aircraft had destroyed the old security o f the Mediterranean route. Capetown and Sierra Leone will have to be developed as complementary to Malta and Aden. But South A fr ica is also destined to great importance as a land power. It leads white A fr ica at a time when the rivalries o f the European powers are again being reproduced in the A frica n continent. The Germans are active in their former colony, German Southwest, while the Italians are expected to imitate the French in making large use o f A frican native troops. Kenya settlers, who have for years looked to South A fr ica fo r an understanding and encouragement denied to them in England, are now highly alarmed at the possibility o f the Tanganyika Mandate being modified to meet the Germans.

THE CHARTERED SCHEME The favourite scheme at the moment is one which was first broached very privately as long ago as 1930. It is a plan to place the former German colonies under a chartered Company. In some parts