March 28, 1936

THE TABLET y l W e e k l y N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS V E S T R IS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V ol. 167. No. 5003. London, March 28, 1936.

S ix p en c e .

R egistered at the General P ost Office as a Newspaper.

Page

News and No t e s ................. 389 In lUo Tempore ................. 393 One More Church? . . . 393 Pro A u s t r i a ............................ 394 “ The Seat of the Beast ” 395 Cossacks for E v e r ................. 395 A Play for Playing . . . 396 From The Tablet of Long

A g o ....................................... 396 R eview s :

“ Between the Desert and the Rain ”

397

St. Bernard ................. 397 Will Shakespeare................. 397 “ The Far Bermoothes ” 398 M. Gheon’s Don Bosco . . . 398

CONTENTS

Page

R eview s ( Oontd.) :

“ C. J. H.”

A Tale was B u i l t ................. 399 New Books and Music . . . 399 Books Received ................. 400 Lenten Pastorals :

398

Lancaster ............................ 401 Shrewsbury ................. 402 Care Committee Work . . . 402 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 405 The Tablet ............................ 407 The Bishop of Pella’s

Golden Jubilee ................. 407 E piscopal Engagements 407

Page

Et Ce t e r a ............................ 408 Barking Abbey (Drawing by M. Kaye) ................. 409 Sermons for the Times— — LXXX ............................ 410 Obituary ............................ 411 Letters to the Ed it o r :

Benediction during Lent 412 The Sea of Galilee . . . 412 Orb 1s Terrarum :

England ............................ 413 Scotland ............................ 414 Ireland ............................ 414 Belgium ............................ 414 Canada ............................414 China ............................ 414

Orb i s Terrarum

Page (Conta.) :

Czechoslovakia

France

Germany

Indochina . ..

Japan

Kenya

Mexico

Monaco

Poland

Spain

Syria

U.S.A.

. . . 414

. .. 414

. .. 414

. . . 414

. . . 414

. . . 415

. . . 415

. . . 415

. . . 415

. .. 415

. . . 415

. . . 415

The Education Bili. A Manchester Demonstration 416 Coming Events . . . 416 Ch e s s ................ . . . 416

NOTANDA

Passion-tide. A Tablet writer peers into “ deep and dim things ” (p. 393).

One more Church ? Reasonable questions to General Evangeline Booth (p. 393).

Austria’s need o f Catholic visitors. The duty and opportunity o f those who tour her countrysides (p. 394).

“ D oor to D oor ” again. H ow agents o f the Russellite (o r Rutherfordian) sect importune English women to buy their anti-English wares (p. 395).

The death o f Mr. Cunninghame Graham. A picturesque figure in literature and politics recalled fo r Catholics by the authorship o f A Vanished Arcadia (408).

A “ libel by will.” The late F. N. Charrington’s bequest to the Protestant Alliance. Plain words fo r the Evening Standard (p. 391).

A n imminent change in the ownership o f The Tablet (p. 407).

NEWS AND NOTES I N these “ News and Notes,” Omega often becomes Alpha. The paragraph which stands first in print to-day has been written last. But our waiting for better news is all in vain. Germany persists in her old habit of keeping the world on tenterhooks ; and France wants Britain to rattle the sword. The dilemma is a bad one. War is too terrible a prospect ; yet Germany must not break pacts with impunity. In political circles this week, we have heard the proposal that other Powers ought to take Herr Hitler at his word and let Germany retire into what he calls “ honourable isolation ” — an isolation economically complete. But this would be only a postponement o f War. The Germans, physically toughened b y their labourcamps and tuned up to militancy, would soon want

New Series. Vol. CXXXV. No. 4402.

miseram pacem vel bello bene mutari, which the ex-Crown Prince might translate “ to exchange a rotten Peace for a jo lly W ar.” This is the horror from which the statecraft o f the world and the prayers o f the Church must save us.

So long and so often has poor Equality been linked with poor Liberty that we must not be surprised when Equality shares L iberty’s fate. It is well known that those who are loudest in praise of Liberty hardly ever mean what they say. The Liberty they want is Liberty for themselves in r irticular ; not Liberty in general. And Equality is in a like plight.

In Germany, the every-day and all-day demand for Equality does not mean simple parity between the Third Reich and other States. It means that Germany must be indulged and pampered in all sorts of things. For example, the responsible statesmen of other countries are expected, at moments o f crisis, to make public speeches in which they say what they mean and mean what they say ; but German orators take leave to utter the most mischievous words in the certainty that ample allowance will be made for their exuberance. Last week, we happened to hear one of the German Fiihrer’s electioneering speeches. It was delivered at a moment o f the greatest possible international ten s ion ; indeed, many publicists said that the hour was the most critical since 1914. Yet the Chancellor declared that, whatever comes, Germany will not give up one centimetre o f her equal rights, and that it does not matter to Germany whether the rest of the world agrees with her or not. And so on. We ask what would have been said o f a British or Belgian or French statesman if such rough words had been used in London or Brussels or Paris. The truth is that Germany, ever since we remember, has been wanting Inequality, with the advantage always on her side. After her leaders have enjoyed themselves in wanton oratory, they rely upon us all, not excepting the very States they have taunted, to say “ Well, w e l l ! We must