November 23, 1935

THE TABLET N . W eek ly N ew s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DUM VOBIS GHATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS VESTRIS CONSTANTER MANE ATI S

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V o l . 166. No. 4985. L o n d o n , N o v e m b e r 23, 1935.

S i x p e n c e .

Registered at the General P ost Of f ic i as a Newspaper.

Page

News and No t e s ................. 653 A Chinese Canberra? . . . 657 The Larger Nationalism . . . 657 “ Who Eats Priest . . .” 658 Cardinal Bourne and the

General Strike ................. 658 Catholics in the New Parliament 659 “ Spiritualist Services" . . . 659 The Russian Emigre Church 660 Prom The Tablet of Long

Ago . . . . . . . . . . . . 660 Reviews :

Fads and F a c t s ................. 661 A King of Israel . . . 661

C O N T E N T S

R eview s ( Gontd.) :

Page

Diana ............................ 661 Frightfulness Flagrant . . . 662 A Blind G u i d e ................. 662 New Books and Music . . . 663 Books Received ................. 664 St. Bede's, Chadwell Heath 665 Letters to the Ed it o r :

Libels on Communities . . . 666 Catholic Candidatures . . . 666 The Export of Horses . . . 666 The Feast Day at Old Hall 667 The Belfast Outrages . . . 667 Coming Events .............. 667

Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

Page spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 669 Two Coming Exhibitions . . . 670 Obituary ............................ 670 Cardinal Bourne. A Memorial Window . . . 671 A Relic Chapel at Saltley 671 Et Cæ t e r a ............................ 672 Orbis Terrarum:

England ............................ 674 Wales ............................ 674 Ireland ............................ 674 Australia ............................ 675 Austria ............................ 675

Orbis T errarum {Gontd.) :

Page

China ........................ 675 France ........................ 676 Holland ........................ 676 India ..................... 676 I t a l y ....................................... 677 Latvia ........................ 677 Norway ........................ 677 Poland ........................ 678 South Africa ................. 678 The South Sea Islands . . . 678 Spain ........................ 678 Switzerland ................. 680 U.S.A....................................... 680 Social and P ersonal . . . 680 Ch e s s ....................................... 680

NOTANDA Great Britain’s General Election. Many Tablet notes and articles on the figures and their meanings (pp. 653-4, 657, 658, 672). Catholic Members o f the new Parliament (p. 659).

Manchukuo’s neighbours. The future o f Northern China (p. 657).

The late Cardinal Bourne and the General Strike o f nine years ago. A chapter in Dr. Bell’s L ife o f Lord Davidson (p. 658).

Spiritist “ services.” The demand fo r B.B.C. broadcasts (p. 659).

The schisms among Orthodox Russian exiles. Prospects o f a settlement (p. 660).

A chapel in Kent. In another o f her pen-andink drawings Miss Mary Kaye depicts the shrine o f Our Lady o f Hartley (p. 673).

Frightfulness to-day. A terrible book from a German pen (p. 662).

NEWS AND NOTES O UR WORLD to-day is beholder of many a Parliament from which every vestige of democracy has disappeared. The Members may still be called “ deputies ” ; but no freely-voting electorate has deputed them to perform legislative tasks. The Parliaments to which we allude com prise no Oppositions ; because the electors have been restricted to lists of candidates officially drafted. It is fully understood, however, even in far-off and ill-informed countries, that Great Britain retains her genuinely representative institutions. Therefore the victory of Mr. Baldwin’s Government at last week’s General Election is duly appreciated throughout the civilized world. Mankind’s confidence in our traditional stability has been confirmed. But this almost universal confidence lays

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heavy responsibilities upon His Majesty’s Ministers, and indeed upon us all. The other nations are doing us the great honour of trusting us for leadership, not only in policies and ideas but in beneficent action. We must therefore live and work on the principle noblesse oblige. A Britain refilled with bickerings would not only do vast harm to our own welfare but would dismay and dishearten those less favoured peoples who are hoping that our strong and brotherly hand will lift them out o f the slough of despond and that our horse sense will save them from falling into it again.

Several keen-eyed mentors chide us by letters for having underestimated, in a recent article, the total electorate of Great Britain. The correct figure, they say, is 31,000,000. But surely this does not mean that there are 31,000,000 electors. It is the aggregate o f possible votes : not of the flesh-and-blood voters. A married business-man living, say, at Wimbledon, has a vote for his private residence and another vote for his City premises. In respect of both buildings his wife also has a vote. Thus one married couple has four votes in all, and may, if they be persons o f wealth, have six or ten or twenty votes scattered over the registers of England, Scotland and Wales. The restrictions on the exercise of plural voting do not cancel the register-entries. In our own head, we worked out a deduction from the register totals, with a view to guessing the total number o f voters (not votes), and we think we were not far out. But if anybody can give us precise figures, we shall be glad to have them.

Putting even the most charitable interpretation upon the returns, we fear that one-fifth of those electors who could have voted failed to do so. In reaching this humiliating conclusion we have made allowance for the fact that there was no polling in about forty constituencies— say, one-fifteenth of the whole number— and that the unopposed returns excused about tw o million persons from going to the booths. Further, we have allowed for the normal

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