September 29, 1934

THE TABLET

A W e e k l y N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DOM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMOS UT IN INCCEPTI8 VESTRIS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V o l . 164. No. 4925. London, September 29, 1934.

S i x p e n c e .

R eg is tereo at thb General P o st O f f ic e as a Nbw s papb b .

Page

New s and No t e s ...................3 85 Wielder of the Sword and

Bearer of the Scales . . . 389 A Minister of Holidays— I I I 390 The House of Fausta and the Recent Archeological Discoveries in the Lateran Basilica ........................ 392 R e v ie w s :

From the C.T.S.................... 393 The Week’s Good Cause 394 A Mixed Bag ................. 394 From Berlin via Paris . .. 394 “ Myself When Y oung” . . . 394 Without Malta ................. 395

CONTENTS

Page

Reviews ( Contd.). A Breton F igh ter................. 395 New B ooks and Mu s ic . . . 396 Books Received ................. 396 The Eucharistic Congress... 397 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years A g o ............................ 397 Helvetia and Russia . . . 397 Ch e s s .......................................... 399 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 401 Abbot Taylor, O.S.B. . . . 402

Page

Et CLe t e r a .............................. 403 The Pilgrimage of Peace . . . 404 Coming Events .................. 404 Catholic Education Notes . .. 405 Ushaw’s New President . .. 406 Abergele: The New Church 406 Ordination at Hawkstone

H a l l ....................................... 407 L etters to the Ed it o r :

The Church in Wales . . . 408 Mussolini and Hitler . . . 408 Obitu ary .............................. 409 Wills ....................................... 409 An Essex Church Burnt

*>own ............................409

I Orb i s T err arum :

England .............. Scotland .............. Ireland .............. Belgium .............. Canada .............. Holland Poland .............. Spain .............. Turkey .............. U.S.A......................... West Africa So c ia l and P ersonal

Page . . . 410 . . . 410 . . . 410 . . . 411 . . . 411 . . . 411 . .. 411 . . . 411 . .. 412 . . . 412 . .. 412 ... 412

N O T A N D A Back to Rome. The H oly Father’s return from Castelgandolfo (p. 401).

Saint Michael the Warrior. A Tablet leaderwriter offers some thoughts to be pondered for Michaelmas Day (p. 389).

The Eucharistic Congress. The Cardinal A rch bishop’s letter o f greeting, for the Hierarchy o f England and Wales, to the faithful assisting at the great gathering in Argentina (p. 397).

W hy Switzerland said N o to the Soviet’s application for admission to the League o f Nations. M. Motta’s fine speech in full (p. 397).

How the sixty-thousand ex-combatants fared at Lourdes. Moving scenes during the international Pilgrimage o f Peace (p. 404).

The recent discoveries beneath the Lateran Basilica. What the labours o f the “ Fossores ” have revealed (p. 392).

Abergele. The Bishop o f Menevia’s sermon for the opening o f the new church (p. 406).

Handsome was as Hansom did. A coming centenary celebration at Birmingham (p. 403).

At Ramsgate. The blessing o f the new Abbot o f St. Augustine’s (p. 402).

NEW S AND NOTES ' I 'H E old soldiers who are known by the chilly

-*• name of “ ex-Service men ” are home from Lourdes. Those reporters who have told their readers that this Pilgrimage o f Peace was unique, and that it “ made a deep impression ” and “ appealed powerfully to the public’s imagination ” and left the veterans themselves with “ ineffaceable memories ” have told the truth ; but, as we said before, the supreme fact of this Pilgrimage is that men who believe in prayer have prayed. Behind the throng on the banks of the Gave which the

New Series. Vol. CXXXII. No. 4324.

photographers’ cameras " took ,” was massed an invisible multitude of stay-at-homes fervently backing up the pilgrims’ devotion. In the nature of things, a sudden and spectacular answer to the prayers is not to be demanded by our impatience ; but it will not be possible for the world to be just what it would have been if all these prayers had not been prayed.

A grim coincidence must be recorded here. In last week’s “ News and Notes,” there was a paragraph about Great Britain’s immunity from attack by the more violent forces o f Nature ; and we made special mention of typhoons. Our words were printed on the Thursday night ; and by the time they were published, on Friday, the worst typhoon for thirty years had devastated a large part of japan. Countless lives were lost ; school-buildings crashed down upon pupils, killing hundreds of them ; and, according to one report, a community of poor lepers perished in a tidal wave which was part of the disaster. And here is another coincidence. Only seven days before writing about typhoons, we had dwelt (in an article called “ Our American Brothers ” ) on the tendency of some newspaper readers to differentiate between human lives. “ It was only in China,” or “ only in Japan,” is the sort o f phrase one hears too often. Every one of these Japanese lives was as precious to somebody as is a white man’s life to his nearest friend.

Before the Tokyo telegrams had disclosed the full horror of the Japanese calamity, Britain was mourning over a disaster on her own soil. Not with the brutal naturalness of typhoons and tidal waves, but deep in the darkness o f Man’s petty burrowings through the bowels o f the earth, terror and death struck their blows. In this mining disaster at Gresford Colliery no less than 262 men and youths lost their lives. It will be little to the credit of those directly concerned if strife is allowed to break out in the Welsh coalfields at such a time.