Uly 7, 1984

THE TABLET ¿4 Weekly Newspaper and Review

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS VESTRIS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

Vol. 164. No. 4913.

London, J uly 7, 1934.

Sixpence.

R e g is t er ed at the General P ost Of f ic e as a New spa per .

Page

News and No t e s ................ 1 Quien S a b e ? ............................. 5 The N ext E l e c t i o n ................ 6 The H ub and the R im . . . 6 The L e tte rs of H ila rio n . . . 7 Books Received ................ 8 R e v ie w s :

E n t e r the M oralist . . . 8 Abbot Cabrol’s F ilial

O f f e r i n g ............................. 9 Le P e t i t T r i a n o n ................ 9 Old Stones in E a s t Anglia 10 New Books an d Music . . . 11 Catholic E ducation Notes . . . 12

CO NT

Page

The C rusade of Rescue . . . 12 The Universities’ Catholic

E ducation B o a r d ................... 13 E p is c o pa l E ngagements 13 Freshfield’s Golden Jubilee 14 Correspondence :

Rome (O u r Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly L e tte r from ) ............................... 17 W estm inster O rd in a tio ns . . . 18 Three New Churches . . . 19 F rom The Tablet of N inety

Y ears A g o ............................... 19

ENTS

P a s e

E t Ce t e r a ............................. 20 The Converts’ A id Society 21 Obituary ............................ 21 Letters to th e E d ito r :

C a rd in a l B ou rn e ’s Jubilee 22 “ A R in g and a Chalice ” 22 B lackshirt Morality 22 O u r Ladye of W alsingham 23 Or b is T errarum:

England ............................. 23 Scotland ............................ 24 W ales ............................. 24 I r e la n d ............................. 24

Or b is Terrarum

Page (Contd.) :

A rg en tin a . . . ................ 24 China ................ 24 F rance ................ 26 In d ia ................ 26 Manchukuo ................ 26 Rhodesia ................ 26 Spain ................ 26 The S aar . . . ................ 26 U ganda ................ 28 Coming E vents ................ 28 Social and P ersonal . . . 28 Ch e s s ................ ................ 28

NOTANDA

Fright fulness in the Third Reich. The outstanding lesson of a sanguinary week-end (p. 5).

Britain’s next General Election. A well-grounded warning to Catholics (p. 6).

Fifty years at Freshfield. In a sermon for the golden jubilee, the Archbishop of Liverpool surveys a great field of labour in the cause of the Foreign Missions (p. 14).

Another performance by the Ladies of the Grail. “ Hilarion’s ” impressions at the Cambridge Theatre (p. 7).

Blessed Edmund Arrowsmith, S.J. To-morrow’s ceremony at Ashton-in-Makerfield (p. 20).

How problem breeds problem. The hard case of a church in a slum-area of Leeds (p. 3).

Two Catholic good works. The Crusade of Rescue, and the Converts’ Aid Society, respectively report upon another year’s activities (pp. 12, 21).

“ Hub-men and Rim-men.” A parable from an aerodrome (p. 6).

A modern Bath-chairman. What he has done, and what he is about to do (p. 20).

A year fruitful in church-building. Three new churches in the provinces (p. 19).

NEWS AND NOTES T_TAPPILY Field-Marshal von Hindenburg is still the Head and not merely the figure-head of the German Reich. His formidable aegis has protected the intrepid Herr von Papen from dismissal and probably from a violent death. But Germany’s true friends must not rely too much upon her Grand Old Man. Berlin has ways of circumventing Neudeck. Something, however, has been gained by the venerable President’s firm stand. The world has been reminded that there remain in the Fatherland many fine Germans who have not bowed the N ew Series. Vol. CXXXII. No. 4312.

knee to the Baal of Totalitarian despotism. Herr Hitler’s lieutenants were wrong last Monday when they boasted that all opposition to their rule was at an end. The echoes of the Marburg speech rumble powerfully in Germany, although its ipsissitna verba are still denied to German ears.

Not the least horrible of the news-items from Berlin at the beginning of this week was the official statement that Captain Rohm (a Nazi Minister, without portfolio, who had once been chief of Herr Hitler’s Brown Army) was locked up in a room where a loaded pistol lay on a table, and that, when he hung back from committing suicide, he was shot. Even if it be true that Rohm was, indeed, plotting a new revolution, it was a dreadful thing to tempt him to the sin and crime of suicide. That the Fiihrer’s old comrade of the Putsch days shrank from self-destruction out of cowardice is incredible. In refusing suicide Rohm may have had a religious motive ; or he may have been proudly conscious of such innocence that suicide would have been not only felo de se but a lying calumny against his own honour. We learn, however, that men less famous than the one-time chief of the Brown Army were also given the option of suicide, together with the necessary lethal weapons, and that many of them “ took ” their own lives, as the phrase goes, rather than be shot by their captors. When we read English History we often have a shudder at the thought of three or four men going to the block or the gibbet as traitors ; but the week-end butcher’sbill in the Third Reich (suicides included) was big enough to have affrighted Tower Hill or Tyburn.

In one case at least, a distinguished German who was killed in last Saturday’s drive has been falsely branded as a suicide. We allude to Herr Eric Klausener, President of Catholic Action in that very diocese of Berlin concerning which Count Stolberg wrote to us so indignantly a week ago. All who knew him agree th a t this fine layman was the last man to imperil his Catholic work by