THE TABLET s i W eek ly N ew s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS VESTR IS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief o f His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V o l . 162. No. 4878.

L o n d o n , N o v e m b e r 4, 1933.

S i x p e n c e .

REGISTERED AT TH 1 GENERAL P O S T O e Jj'I C E AS A NEWSPAPER.

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New s and No t e s ........... 585 Germany’s Worst Friends 589 A Campaign of Disintegra­

tion ....................................... 590 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years A g o .................... ' .5 9 1 R e v i e w s :

The Trial of the Maid . . . 592 Franciscan History . . . 592 Rome and Canterbury . . . 592

CONTENTS

R ev 1ew s ( Oontd.) ;

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This England ................. 593 The Book Which Is

D i f fe ren t ............................ 594 Books Received ................. 594 New Books and Music . . . 595 Catholic Education Notes . . . 596 Cardinal Bourne in East

London ............................ 597 Ob it u ary .............................. 598 E p is c o p a l E ngagements 599 Coming E vents ...................5 99 Ch e s s ...........................................5 99

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Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Correspondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 601 L etters to th e E d it o r :

Press Defence ................. 603

Hush, Hush.” ................. 603 The Teachers’ Anti-War Movement ................. 604 “ Everyman ” 604 The Eucharistic Congress 606 ET C/ETERA............................ 606

Or b i s Terrarum :

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England ............................ 608 Scotland ............................ 608 Wales ............................ 608 Ireland ............................ 608 Ceylon ............................610 France ............................ 610 Germany ............................ 610 Hungary ...............................610 Spain ............................ 610 U.S.A....................................... 612 So c ia l and P ersonal . . . 612

NOTANDA Cardinal Bourne once more among his flock in East London. The opening o f the new school in Lucas Street (pp. 596, 597).

Germany’s W orst Friends. British encouragement fo r Nazi grievances. Its effect in Berlin (p. 589).

A memorable afternoon. “ The Grail’s ” performance o f Everyman in the Royal Albert Hall (p. 604).

“ Our programme is a blood-soaked reality; our fighting preparations are fo r world revolution.” More facts about M oscow ’s campaign to enlist Youth in such a cause (p. 590).

Russian Timber. A decision in the Court o f Appeal (p. 587) and a grave affront to Canada (p. 586).

East Fulham. Varying interpretations o f the Conservative candidate’s heavy defeat (p. 585).

An Anglican Bishop’s wise words on the Divorce Court and on Nullity Decrees (p. 587).

Trouble in Palestine. The difficulties o f the Mandatory Power (p. 586).

A triumph o f town-planning. What Garbatella has to show (p. 602).

NEWS AND NOTES TT was such new news when we wrote about it last week that the East Fulham by-election’s repercussions had not become audible. When the publicists regained the breath which Mr. W ilm ot’s victory had taken away from them, their interpretations o f events were almost as many as themselves. According to unteachable Tories, o f the kind most beloved b y the officials of Conservative Associations, the ignominious position of Mr. Waldron at the bottom of the poll was due to factors of small political significance, such as their j candidate’s lack of platform gifts and the apathy of the many electors who were over-confident that East Fulham, which had never in all its history returned a Labour candidate to Parliament, could be trusted to elect one more Conservative without their troubling to vote. Other critics took other views. Certain of them declared that the 20,902 absentees from the polling-booths were mostly men and women with such strong Conservative principles that they stayed at home rather than support a Baldwinite candidate who would help to betray the Empire by sticking to Locarno and letting India go. Others, including men known for their common sense, told us that the Government’s banner-bearer had bitten the dust because he fought as a Conservative rather than as a National candidate. Our own explanation is much more simple and much less comfortable. Those electors of East Fulham who both support bellicose Russia and applaud Mr. Lansbury’s advice that no young Englishman should enlist for the defence o f his country in the Navy, Army, or Air Force, took the by-election seriously. Every able-bodied man and woman among them exercised the suffrage. By inquiries made since the declaration o f the poll, we are convinced that Mr. Wilmot, the new M.P., represents only a minority of the East Fulham electorate ; but he has won because he had behind him a large majority o f those East Fulhamites who are in earnest about politics. When the abstentionists begin to complain that they are misrepresented in Parliament they ought to be told sharply that they have none but themselves to blame. Meanwhile, we repeat our warnings of last week. The loud singing of “ The Red Flag after the announcement o f Mr. W ilm ot’s victory means that multitudes of our fellow-countrymen are being seduced b y the promise of remedies for our economic ills which are worse than the diseases for which they are prescribed.

During the nineteenth century, the peoples fought and bled to get Parliaments. In this twentieth

N ew Series. Vol. CXXX. No. 4277.