November 18, 1933.

THE TABLET

N . W e e k l y N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS V E S TR IS CONSTANTER MANE AT IS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

Vol. 162. No. 4880. London, November i 8, 1933.

Sixpence.

R eg is tered at the General P ost Off ic e as a New s pape r .

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New s and No t e s ......... 649 Hobsohn’s Choice ................. 653 The Irish D ia spora......... 653 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years A g o .................... 654 The Seal of the Confessional 655 Books Received . . . . . . 655 R e v i e w s :

Ad Altari Dei ................. 656 I f ! ....................................... 656 Far-Eastern Travel . . . 657 The Atonement ................. 658 New Books and Music . . . 658 The Law R e tr a c t s ......... 659

CONTENTS

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Martinmas in the City . . . 661 Coming E vents ............... 661 Catholic Council for Inter­

national Relations . . . 662 Obitu ary ............................6 63 Funeral of Abbot Chapman 663 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ......................... 665 The Holy Father and the

Converts’ Aid Society . . . 666 Beauraing ......................... 666

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Catholic Education Notes . . . 667 L etters to the Ed i t o r :

The late Abbot Chapman 668 Cardinal Newman and

Scripture .............. 668 Tshekedi ............................ 668 The Church in Holland 668 The Children and Young

Persons’ Act .................669 W a r ............................ 669 The E.C.U..................669 E t Cc e t e r a ................... 670 Ch e s s ...............................671

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Or b i s Terraeum :

England ............................ 672 Ireland ............................ 672 China ............................ 673 France ............................ 673 India ............................ 674 Portugal ............................ 674 Spain ............................ 674 Uganda ............................ 675 West Africa ................. 675 Yugo Slavia ................. 675 The Austin Canons at

Oxford and Cambridge . . . 676 So c ia l and P ersonal . . . 676

NOTANDA Tw o General Elections — Germany’s, last Sunday; and Spain’s, to-m orrow (pp. 653, 674).

Anglo-Irish relations. A Tablet leader-writer recalls a point too often overlooked (p. 653).

Lady Violet Bonham Carter again. More “ meticulous accuracy.” H ow Good K ing Wenceslas turned Bad at the ripe age o f 500 years (p. 655).

The English Church Union. Lord H a lifa x ’ s letter o f resignation to the E.C.U. Secretary; and a letter from an Anglican Rector to The Tablet (pp. 652, 669).

Protection fo r wild birds from the methods o f Club Row. A legislative success (p. 649).

Prohibition in Canada and the U .S .A . Tw o letters on the present position o f Temperance teaching (p. 651).

Bequests fo r Masses. The final overthrow o f a long-held precedent. Mr. Justice Luxmoore’ s judgment in Lindeboom v. Camille (pp. 659, 660).

O f the Ark, and the D ove, and the men who sailed fo r Maryland (p. 670).

Abbot Smith, C .R .L ., in a lecture to the Lingard Society, tells the story o f the Austin Canons at O x fo rd and Cambridge (p. 676).

NEWS AND NOTES T ORD H O W A R D OF P E N R IT H and his ■L / backers are to be congratulated on the safe passage through Parliament o f the Bird Protection Bill. The Tablet is proud to have had some part in this legislative success. The fighting was often hard. W e were sorry to find M a jo r Hills, Commander Marsden, Mr. Pike, and other Members opposing the Bill on the ground that it was class legislation. One o f them took the line that “ a rich man can enjoy the pleasure o f a huge private N ew Series. Vol. CXXX. No. 4279.

aviary,” and therefore a poor man should be allowed to keep wild birds in little cages. One might as well say that, while rich Orientals keep spacious harems, we must tolerate a White Slave Traffic fo r the benefit o f smaller purses. The A ct is not Class Legislation. It is Bird Legislation. Towards birds and beasts and all sentient creatures, men and women must act as the stewards and gerents o f the God o f L ov e ; and few indeed are the wild wing’d creatures that can be shut up for life in small cages without enormous cruelty. T o diminish such cruelty the new A c t should do much; but there is further work to be done. Club Row will try to bring over wild birds from abroad; and the plan must be frustrated by a veto on such imports.

Because they do not take part in those “ united religious services ” which so rarely attain to complete solemnity, Catholics are suspected of indifference to the nation’s rejoicings and sorrowings. This is because our non-Catholic fellowcitizens know little of our ways and works. Take, for example, last Saturday— the fifteenth anniversary o f Armistice Day. We who write this Note were about six miles from Charing Cross on the morning o f the Silence. Having made our way to the nearest Catholic church— it was a church with the thoroughly English patronal name o f St. Edward the Confessor— we found ourselves at a ceremony o f which the general public would know nothing ; yet the quiet impressiveness o f the rite was beyond description. No fanfares, no Last Post, could have enhanced its dignity. Six candles burned around a great catafalque. The Altar, bare of flowers, was vested, like the catafalque, in violet. At half-past ten a Low Mass began and ran its brief course in silence. Nobody broke the intimate transaction by any intrusive discourse or “ well-chosen words.” After Mass, without a break, the catafalque was bedewed and censed ; and then celebrant, servers, crucifer and candle-bearers simply stood quietly, as did all the people, facing eastward