THE TABLET

A W e e k l y N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS KTIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS VESTR IS CONSTANTER MAN EAT IS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V ol. 161. No. 4851.

L ondon, A pr il 29, 1933.

S i x p e n c e .

Registered at the General Post Office as a Newspaper.

Page

New s and No t e s ...................5 21 Sauce for the Gander . . . 525 The -Ism and the -Ists . . . 525 A New Defence of Anglican

Orders ............................ 527 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years A g o ............................ 529 R e v ie w s :

English Stained Glass . . . 530 Under “ Bell H a rry ” . . . 530 The Seven Sonnets of

Genesis ............................ 531 M odernism ............................ 531 Redemptorist Counsels . . . 532

CONT

Page

New Books and Music . . . 532 Books Received ................. 533 Liverpool Cathedral . . . 534 The Conference of Higher

Studies ............................ 534 Ch e s s ....................................... 535 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 537 Catholic Education Notes . . . 538 The Midland Tertiary Con­

vention ............................ 539

ENTS

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E t C/e t e r a .............................. 540 St. Joseph’s, Weymouth . . . 541 Back to the L a n d ................. 541 L etters to the E d it o r :

St. Etheldreda’ s, Ely Place 542 Closed R e t r e a t s ................. 542 A Club’s Bad Taste................. 542 Ob it u a r y ...............................5 43 A Carmelite Jubilee . . . 544 Coming E vents .................. 544 E p is c o p a l E ngagements 544 Or b i s Terrarum :

England ............................ 544 Scotland ............................ 545

Page

Orbis Terrarum (Oontd.) : Wales ...................... .. 546

Ireland ...................... .. 546 JBritish East Africa .. 546 Canada ...................... .. 546 France ...................... .. 546 Holland ...................... .. 546 India ...................... .. 547 Korea ...................... .. 547 M an ch u r ia ...................... . 547 South Africa . 548 Spain ...................... . 548 So c ia l and P ersonal . . 548

N O T A N D A The Municipal Elections in Spain. A call which the Government refuses to heed (p. 525). Some incidents on Election Day (p. 548).

H o ly Week in Spain and Portugal. The growing strength o f Catholic piety (p. 524).

Communists and Protestant pastors. Plain words from the Presbyterian Scotsman (p. 526).

The world’s 160,000,000 “ listeners-in.” Some figures and comments on Broadcasting, foreign and British (p. 522).

Stained Glass in England. A good book on the surviving examples (p. 530).

Unclean books. A hint to a certain Society (p. 524).

Whitsuntide at Liverpool. The programme, in detail, o f an eventful week-end (p. 534).

Anglican Orders. An Open Letter examined and found wanting (p. 527).

Exeter remembers. Last Sunday’s ceremonies, in honour o f Father George Oliver, in church and in The Mint (p. 540).

Dr. Hackett’ s successor. The new Bishop o f W aterford and Lismore (p. 546).

NEWS AND NOTES ]V/T ONDAY next will be May-day. Once a merrie festival of spring-tide and o f Our Lady, it was largely turned, a generation ago, from a joy -day in green to a hate-day in red. Happily it has been wrested back in more than one country. For Catholics, May-day will bring in a month o f devotion to that Virgin Mother o f God from whom our Divine Redeemer took the human body in which He suffered and died. To some o f us, the Low Masses o f May are trials, because of the vernacular rosaries which break the silence and distract the mind ; but so long as this is a Catholic practice, we must make the best o f it and not the worst.

N ew Series. Vol. C X X IX . No. 4,250.

This year’s Budget flatters our national pride ; and, as usual, pride is an expensive indulgence. Envied b y other nations, Britain has once more balanced her annual accounts ; but only at the cost o f tremendous sacrifices. The grievous burden of taxation has been hardly at all lightened. Probably we shall have to groan under it for a long while, because no less a sum than £700,000,000 has to be raised every year. This huge total represents only the taxes imposed by Parliament. When we add to it the rates levied b y various local Councils, we find that taxes and rates together grab sums of money equal to one-third of the national income. An American journalist recently stated this fact in an arresting way. He told us that John Smith has to work all Monday and all Tuesday for the Government, national and local, and that therefore he does not begin to labour for himself and his family until Wednesday morning. Putting it in another way, John Smith works from the first day o f January until the last day o f April in order to meet the demands of the tax-collector and the rate-collector ; and it is only on May-day that he sets about earning the money for a whole year’s subsistence. For many a day, serious citizens have been shaking their heads and saying that such expenditure cannot go on ; but it goes on in spite o f them. So long as the Supply Votes alone stand at a level higher than £450,000,000, it will be impossible for any Chancellor o f the Exchequer to spare our pockets more generously than Mr. Chamberlain has done. There is nothing for it but to pay up with as good a grace as we can command and to do our best for the trade o f the country with the very little cash which remains to us.

There will be loud protests against Mr. Chamberlain’s small reduction in the beer duty, a reduction which will make a half-pint glass o f this old English beverage just one halfpenny cheaper. But the case for reduction was overwhelming. Ever since the War, our working classes have patiently endured an unfair discrimination against them. No other