THE TABLET

s £ W e e k l y N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS V E S TR IS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V o l . 161. No. 4845.

L o n d o n , March 1 8 , 1 9 3 3 .

S i x p e n c e .

Registered at the General Post Office as a Newspaper.

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New s and No t e s ................... 321 A Call from Clmrt . . . 325 The Ides of March . . . 326 Resting at the Frontier . . . 326 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years Ago

R e v ie w s :

327

Dr. Orchard’s Book . . . 328 The “ Beda Review” . . . 329 In Ccena Domini . . . 330 Vincible Ignorance . . . 330 Books Received ................. 330 New Books and Music . . . 331

CONT

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L enten P a s t o r a l s :

Liverpool ............................332 Southwark 332 Clifton ............................ 333 Bishop Dunn’s Memorial 334 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’ s Weekly Letter from ) .............................. 337 The Only Catholic Church

Left in Russia .................338 E t C.e t e r a ...............................339 Catholic Education Notes 340 Coming E v e n t s ...................340 Obitu ary .............................. 341

ENTS

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Society of Our Lady of

Lourdes ............................ 341 L etters to the E d i t o r :

A Point of Exegesis . . . 342 The Catholic Education

Council ............................ 342 A Personal Statement . . . 342 From Samoa ................. 342 “ Baptized” Latin . . . 342 The Reorganization of

Industry ............................ 343 Ireland’s Wandering Monks and Scholars ................. 343 Orb 1s Te rrarum :

England ............................ 344

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Or b is T errarum (Contd.) Wales .............. 344

Ireland .............. 344 Belgian Congo 346 Canada .............. 346 China .............. 346 France .............. 346 Germany .............. 346 Hongkong .............. 346 Jehol .............. 346 Poland .............. 347 Spain .............. “ A Recent Novel ” 347 348 So c ia l and P ersonal 348 Chess ................ 348

NOTANDA

An interim Note on the Sovereign Pontiff’s Consistorial Allocution (p. 321).

Mr. Lloyd George on Geneva’ s failure. His call fo r a W orld-Conference o f Churches. And his regrettable remarks on German Disarmament (p. 325),

Hitlerism begins hitting. A Tablet leaderwriter’s p roof that the Dictatorship in Germany has no mandate from a majority o f the people (p. 326).

The memorial to Bishop Dunn in the Cathedral at Nottingham. Three illustrations from “ a prayer-book in stone ” (pp. 334-5).

Dr. Orchard’ s book. The ex-pastor o f K ing’s W eigh House Church unfolds an “ autobiography o f religious development ” (p. 328).

Tristan da Cunha’s Anglican Commissioner. A case fo r prompt action by the Secretary o f State fo r the Colonies (p. 324).

NEWS AND NOTES TN his Consistorial Allocution, the Sovereign

Pontiff used words such as most Christian teachers and preachers, in their fear o f being called old-fashioned, would shrink from uttering. His Holiness asked whether there is not a connection between the present miseries o f the world an-4 ’ widespread godlessness o f mankind. When on ry Englishmen go to church and join in the p i ms for the day, they come again and again upon clear allusions to the Creator’s wrath against those who flout His word and commandment. They ask Almighty God to deal with the wicked “ according to their works.” They pray that His enemies may become “ as dust before the wind,” that they may ” melt like wax,” that they may be “ brought to nought,” that they may be “ broken in

| pieces like a potter’s vessel,” and that the Lord ; may have them in derision. Yet they are shocked 1 when it is suggested to them that the divine government o f the world may be as direct to-day as it was twenty-five centuries ago and that our troubles may be punishments for the outright, formal denial o f God in many lives and for His dethronement by millions o f His creatures who prefer to worship pride and pleasure. I f neglect of their Creator did indeed bring down disasters upon peoples in the Near East in David’s time or Solom on’s, it is presumable that similar causes will have similar effects in our own day. If, on the contrary, it be only a silly fairy tale that the Creator occupies Himself with His creatures in 1933, then the Scriptures are no more than literature, and we waste our time in scanning them in any other light.

Mr. Roosevelt has made a good start as President. The Old W orld is familiar with Presidential “ messages ” to Congress, some of which have been more wordy than useful. But it is a less common experience to hear a President addressing his fellowcitizens directly through a microphone. Last Sunday night, the new Head of the United States made a deep impression by a broadcast address on the banking situation ; indeed, we hear o f Americans who said, after hearing Mr. Roosevelt’s words, that they wished they had voted for him last November and that they now believe in him as the true leader of their nation.

It is not for an English newspaper to intrude upon the purely domestic politics o f the U.S.A., but perhaps we may respectfully inform Mr. Roosevelt that there is one matter in which the Christian world looks to him to do the right thing. Ever since his election, more than four months ago, powerful influences have been brought to bear upon him in order to secure a recognition by Washington of the usurping and persecuting Government in Moscow. He has been assured that such recognition would stimulate trade between the two Republics, thereby reducing unemployment in the U.S.A. Similar

N ew Series. Vol. CXXIX. No. 4,244.