THE TABLET A W eek ly N ew sp a p e r a n d R e v ie w

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS V E S TR IS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V o l . 160. No. 4,826. L o n d o n , N o v e m b e r 5, 1932.

S i x p e n c e .

R eg is tered at tue General P ost Of f i c e as a Newspaper.

Page

Newb and No t e s ................. 589 The Communist Child . . . 593 Dr. Goudge on the Pope 593 Sidelights on William of Wykeham ............................ 595 Henri GhSon’s " Nicolazic ” 596 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years A g o ............................ 596 R e v ie w s :

Belgium’s Part in the

New World ................. 597 Sir Philip Gibbs’ New

Book ............................ 598 Wester marck ................. 598

CONTENTS

Page

R eview s ( Gontd.) :

A Russian Jew’ s Life

Story ............................ 599 On the T re e - to p ................. 599 Deep Doings and Deep

Sea ....................... 600 Books Received ................. 600 New Books and Music . . . 600 The Gospel of Hate . . . 601 New Convent Buildings at

Stafford ............................ 602 Coming Events ................. 602 Ob it u a r y ............................ 603 The League of National

Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

Page spondent’ s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 605 W il ls ............................ 606 Ch e s s ....................................... 607 Et Ca s t e r a ............................ 608 Catholic Education Notes . . . 609 The Knights of St. Columba 610 C.W.L. Rally at Leicester 610 A Village Church in

Gloucestershire ................. 611 The Church and Modern

Problems ............................ 611

Or b is Terrarum :

England .............. Scotland .............. Ireland .............. Australia .............. Austria .............. China .............. Czechoslovakia France .............. Italy .............. Spain .............. Switzerland............... U.S.A......................... Catholic Action So c ia l and P ersonal

Page . . . 612 . . . 612 . . . 612 . . . 613 . . . 613 . . . 613 . . . 613 . . . 614 . . . 614 . . . 614 . . . 616 . . . 616 . . . 616 . . . 616

N O T A N D A

Sacred Art. The Sovereign Pontiff’s exhortation against degeneracy (pp. 591, 605).

The “ Hunger Marchers’ ” hunger fo r revolution and civic disturbance. Some Notes fo r Britons living abroad (p. 589).

The Communist Child. A Red agent’s demand fo r “ a really mass children’s movement ” towards Communism (p. 593).

Sneyd. A strange Church Times comment on The Tablet’s exposure o f “ the Catholic Crusade” (p. 592).

A pastoral from the Scottish hierarchy shows how M oscow ’s Red hand directs evil events in many countries (p. 601).

The muddled divinity o f a Regius Professor. Dr. Goudge on the Bishop o f Rome (p. 593).

More Gheon in English. A good production o f Nicolazic by Our Lady’s Players (p. 596).

A notable addition to a religious house in the Midlands. The new work at St. Joseph’ s Convent, Stafford (pp. 602-3).

A good story from a French village. The clericalism o f a wireless receiving-set (p. 614).

NEWS AND NOTES A S ours is the only English paper to enter certain houses and institutions on the Continent of Europe and in the Republics o f the New W orld , we begin this week’s “ News and N o tes” by asking Continental and overseas readers not to be perturbed by the Hunger Marches which foreign newspapers have grossly exaggerated. It is true that some heads, as well as a few windows, have been broken in small disturbances ; but the hospitals and the glaziers have easily effected the necessary repairs. I f idle sightseers had stayed at home instead of making the street throngs harder for the police to manage, and if the cruder papers had not persisted in working the affair for much more than it was worth, the Hunger March would have made hardly any difference to the routine o f London’s life. It reflects little credit upon the corps o f foreign correspondents living in our metropolis that so many of the newspapers in their home-lands published what our rivals and ill-wishers ardently wanted to hear instead of truthfully reporting what did and did not happen.

In the first place, the Hunger March was an imposture. Honest observers tell us that the marchers were not hungry on the march and did not appear to have suffered privation before leaving home. Some o f them arrived in London footsore and l im p in g ; but this was because the strong new boots issued to them by the organizers had not been “ broken-in ” before the long march began. They carried knapsacks or satchels containing enamelled dinner-plates and, emergency rations. As for the Means Test, which was supposed to be the primary business o f the March, friends o f ours who got into conversation with the marchers en route found that hardly any of them knew even the A B C of the dispute. Nor did the rank-and-file seem to want work or to be sincerely interested in the reduction of Unemployment. They were ob sessed with a groundless belief in an immensely rich England which could easily afford to support millions o f men and women in permanent idleness.

So much for the rank-and-file. But the pick of the marchers, as they would be regarded by the leaders, were out-and-out revolutionaries who carried Red flags, flaunted the Soviet emblems of the Sickle and the Hammer, praised atheist Russia to all persons with whom they came into contact during the march, and were prepared to inflict grievious wounds on the guardians of law and order by means o f heavy sticks studded with murderous nails. The recorded words and works of their leaders

New S e r ie s . Vol. CXXVIII. No. 4,225.