THE TABLET A W e e k l y N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS V E S T R IS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V o l . 160. N o . 4, 821.

London, October i , 1932.

Sixpence.

Registered at the General Post Office as a Newspaper.

Page

N ew s and No t e s .................. 421 Comprehensiveness Indeed! 425 St. Albert the G2*eat . . . 426 E p is c o p a l . E ngagements 429 R e v ie w s :

A New “ Devout L i f e " . . . 429 The C h i e f ............................430 By Pierre and Pierette

Pan ............................431 Two Irish Plays . . . 432 Books Received .................432 New Books and Music . . . 432 Notes for Musicians . . . 433

CONTENTS

Page

Catholic Education Notes 434 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years Ago . . . . . . 435 Ch e s s .......................................... 435 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent's Weekly Letter from) ............................ 437 Ord in a t io n s .................. 438 A^out a Pamphlet Cover 439 L etters to th e Ed it o r :

The Deadweight of “ The

Duds ’ ’

A Puzzle ............................ 440

440

L e t te r s ( Gontd.) :

Pasre

To Correspondents 440 Coming E vents ..440 Burns Oates & Waslibourne.

Limited ......................... , 440 E t Caster a ............... 441 Ob it u ary ........................... . 442 Or b is T errarum :

England ......................... 442 Scotland ......................... . 443 Ireland ......................... . 443 Albania ......................... , 444 Andorra ......................... . 444 Belgium ......................... . 444

Or b i s Teerarum ( Contd.)

Page

Bolivia ............................ 444 Canada ............................444 China ............................ 444 Czechoslovakia ................. 444 Esthonia ............................ 446 France ............................ 446 Italy 446 Portugal ............................ 448 San Domingo ................. 448 Switzerland 448 W il d s 448 The Church and the Social

Problem ....................... 448 So c ia l and P ersonal . . . 448

NOTANDA

Sweet reasonableness in the Cotton and Milk trades. Tw o happy auguries fo r the coining winter (p. 421).

The League o f Nations; its Budget, its prestige, and its Secretariat (p. 422).

France and Germany. Their relapse into an antipathy which bodes ill for Europe (p. 422).

St. Albert the Great. An article by Father W . H. Kent, O.S.C., on the labours and writings o f the recently-proclaimed Saint and Doctor (p. 426).

Comprehensiveness indeed ! Red flags and Muscovite posters in an Anglican parish church. A chance for the Dean o f St. Paul’s (p. 425).

Mr. Gandhi and the Untouchables. Some Notes on a settlement and on a larger question (p. 421).

The rising generation and Marriage. An Anglican clergyman’s wise words (p. 423).

The late Lord Stafford as landlord. A short story o f a farmers’ meeting (p. 441).

The Borough o f Hendon. A glance at a new municipality with many Catholic possessions and associations (p. 441).

NEWS AND NOTES "C'OR England, this week began well. It was announced that peace had been made in the Lancashire cotton-towns and that the threatened Milk War, which would have caused measureless waste and ill-health, had been averted. Mr. F. W. Leggett, whose fame in the Civil Service was already bright, is the man whose tact and skill have mainly secured a settlement o f the Lancashire Strike ; but neither the Cotton Peace nor the Milk Peace could have been arranged without a spirit o f reasonableness and a sense o f social responsibility among the various disputants. The friction caused by u n employment and bad trade will, no doubt, kindle other disputes as the Winter stalks on ; but we can face them less uneasily with this week’s examples fresh in our minds.

From India too there is good news. Taking the least important item first, we learn that Mr. Gandhi is not starving himself to death after a l l ; because terms have been arranged between the caste Hindus and their casteless fellow-Indians which the Mahatma chooses to describe as satisfactory to himself. It would be easy to show, from his words at the Round Table Conference and elsewhere, that, instead of receiving the surrender o f some other party or parties, Mr. Gandhi has abandoned his own former position ; but, although a brief reminder o f this fact is necessary, it would be ungracious to rub it in. As for the British Government, there is ample ground for “ the great satisfaction ” which has been expressed. London never wanted to force upon India the Award which it unwillingly made in the absence o f agreement between the Indian communities themselves. The settlement made this week secures what our Government was firmly resolved to obtain in any e v e n t ; that is to say, such a political emancipation of the Untouchables as will surely lead to their religious and social deliverance also.

Few Britons have thoroughly understood the vileness o f the caste system in its application to the Submerged or Depressed Classes, as the Untouchables are alternatively called. The Simon Commission justly praised the Christian Missions in India for " their splendid work ” in giving these poor outcastes “ a new dignity and a new hope ” ; but it was impossible to do much without the wholehearted help o f high-caste Hindus, and it has long been our grievance against Mr. Gandhi that he has done far less in this direction than he and his trumpeters would have us believe. The Untouchables, according to the Simon Report figures (which we suspect to be an underestimate), number

N ew S e r ie s . Voi. CXXVIII. No. 4,220.