THE TABLET N Weekly Newspaper and Review

DUM V O B IS GRATULAMUR ANIM OS ET IA M ADDIMUS UT IN IN C C E PT IS V E S T R I S CONSTANTER M ANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, lime 4,1870.

Vol. 159. No. 4,788. London, February 13, 1932.

Sixpence.

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Page

News .and No t e s ................... 197 Geneva Gets to W o rk • . . . 201 Im ag in a ry L aw R eports—

V I . . .

202

R e v ie w s :

A M aste r of Mental

P r a y e r ............................... 203 “ Ecclesiastical Greek ” . . . 203 The Puzzled P h ila n th ro p is t 204 New Books and Music . . . 204 Books Received ................... 205 Coming E vents ................... 205

CONT

ENTS

Page

Lenten P astorals : W estm in s te r ................... 206 The V a lia n t Woman . . . 208 Sermons fo r the Times . . . 209 Catholic Education Notes . . . 210 Correspondence :

Rome (O u r Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly L e tte r from ) ............................... 213 L etters to the E d i t o r :

The B ra n ch Theory . . . 214 M aria E d g e w o r th ................... 214

The Catholic Association

Page

D in ner

................ 215

E t C/ETERA . . . ................ 216 Obituary’ ................ 217 W i l l s ................ ................ 217 F rom The Tablet of Ninety

Y ears Ago . . . ................ 217 Ch e s s .........................................2 18 Orbi s Terrarum:

England, Scotland and Wales ............................ 218 I r e la n d ................ . . . 219

Orb is Terrarüm ( Contd.) :

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F ran ce ................................ 220 Hong Kong ................... 220 Mexico ................................2 20 Poland . . . ................ 221 South A frica ............... 222 Spain ................................ 222 Sw itzerland . . . . . . 224 U .S .A . ............................... 224 The D isarm am en t Confer­

ence ............................................ 224 School Sports ................... 224 Social and P ersonal 224

NOTANDA

Anxieties on every side. A Tablet Note-writer begs prayers pro ''Hibernia on the Free State’s polling-day (p. 197).

Hope. The Sovereign Pontiff’s optimistic reminder to his Lenten preachers in Rome (p. 197).

Geneva settles down to Disarmament details (p. 201). A timely sermon by the Archbishop of Birmingham (p. 209).

More about the new Attorney-General’s antiCatholic affiliations. A respectful suggestion for Sir Thomas Inskip’s consideration (p. 198).

“ Mass ” in Protestant churches. An Anglican Bishop speaks out (p. 200).

A Congress, and two centenaries. His Eminence Cardinal Bourne, in a pastoral letter, reminds his flock of three important coming events (p. 206).

The suppression of the Jesuits in Spain. Protests from all parts of the country (p. 222).

M2. The Catholic victims of the disaster (p. 216).

NEWS AND NOTES

O large part of this restless globe is free just now ■* from eruptions of trouble. The Far East has its war ; and Geneva is not yet able to say th a t even the West shall have peace. Australia is standing up bravely to new money-worries ; and world wide Unemployment has grown so bad that even prosperous France counts a million men and women out of work. With so much to distract them, many Britons are paying little heed to an immensely important crisis at their own very doors. We mean the General Election in the Irish Free State. More than 240 candidates have been nominated for the 152 seats in the Dail. Polling-day is next Tuesday and the broad result (though not the full and precise figures) will be known when we go to press on Thursday of next week. While the grave issues which are at stake concern our whole Commonwealth of Nations, there are also points of deep import to Catholics in particular. Just now, there is much for the faithful to pray a b o u t ; but, when we are beseeching divine aid for our brethren in China and Japan and Russia and Mexico, and heavenly guidance for the debaters a t Geneva, it would indeed be mean and foolish to forget Ireland. All of us who can do so ought to hear Mass next Tuesday morning pro Hibernia.

“ There remain Faith, Hope, and Charity, these Three." Defenders of Faith and commenders of Charity are many ; but there are few spokesmen for Hope. Yet Hope was never more necessary than in these dismal days. Our Holy Father, perceiving the dangers of wide-spread pessimism, has charged the Lenten preachers in the Eternal City to set forward in their discourses the Christian optimism. There is a solid ground for “ hoping the best ” ; namely, th a t we are in the hands of God. History shows th a t His hand has again and again righted the wrong policies of men. Further, the Christian, with his belief in immortality and the Beatific Vision, must be an optimist ; because, even if this brief life wholly disappoints him, he knows that the sum-total of his existence can be overwhelmingly happy. Hope is called a “ theological ” virtue because it has God Himself for its goal. To the clergy at home we respectfully suggest th a t there is a theme here for English as well as Roman sermons. Not only the suicides but the murders of these impious days prove th a t the sanctity of human life is lightly regarded. Modern people, who hardly understand th a t “ we are not our own,” are astonished to hear th a t selfmurder is a sin. And preachers know th a t Christian Hope is a beautiful theme. Too many earnest Protestants unconsciously hold th a t we are saved by faith in faith rather than by faith in Christ; and therefore Hope practically drops out of their theology.

New S e r i e s . Vol. CXXVII. No. 4,187.