THE TABLET

A W e e k l y N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS VESTR IS CONSTANTER MAN EAT IS

From the Brief o f His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V o l . 158. No. 4,781. L o n d o n , D e c e m b e r 26, 1931.

S i x p e n c e .

RsaiSTKBID AT TUI GeHBRAL POST OFFICI AS A NlWBPAPIR

Page

New s and No t e s .......... 849 “ And Suddenly— ” . . . 853 Sorrow at the Vatican . . . 854 The Gold Standard in

Dolcedorme 854 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years Ago 856 R e v ie w s :

Saint Francis and Social­

ism

856

Funeral Fashions . . . 857 “ Seven Aching Niches ” 857 Maria Edgeworth’s? . . . 858 Memento Mori ................. 858

CONTENTS

Books Received ............. Page 859 New Books and Music .. 859 A dvent P astorals : Menevia ........................ 860

Plymouth ...................... , 860 Liverpool ........................ 861 Salford ........................ 862 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ........................ 865 Et Cæ t e r a .......................... 867 Catholic Education Notes .. 868

Limbrick-Ouseley

Page

... 868 Or b i s T err arum ( Oontd.) :

Page

L etters to the Ed i t o r :

Possumus .............. 869 The Branch Theory 869 Squadron-Leader Rope. The Memorial Church . . . 869 Ob it u ary ................ 870 “ The Holy Father’s Day ” 870 Next Week’s Tablet 870 Coming E vents 870 Oubis T errarum :

England, Scotland and Wales .............. 871 Ireland .............. 872

Austria ............................ 872 Belgium ............................ 873 Canada ............................ 873 Czechoslovakia ................. 873 France ............................ 873 Hungary ............................ 874 India 874 Italy 874 Poland ............................ 874 Roumania ............................ 874 Spain ............................ 875 So c ia l and P ersonal . . . 876 Ch e s s ....................................... 876

N O T A N D A

Sorrow at the Vatican. A disaster in the world-famous Library (pp. 854, 866).

A Christmas Homily on “ the Suddenness o f Omnipotence ” (p. 853).

Australia’ s General Election. One Catholic Premier makes way fo r another (p. 850).

Messrs. Gandhi and Gayda. A case for thorough sifting (p. 851).

A Catholic poet. Mr. Egerton Clarke’s new hook reviewed and sampled (p. 857).

Russia’s timber-camps and their English protectors. A lecture examined by a Tablet Notewriter (p. 851).

Back to “ Dolcedorme.” The Bcfana up-to-date (p. 854).

Baroness Anatole von Hügel, t ie r work for the Church, at Cambridge, described in a tribute to her memory (p. 870).

A picture fo r the season, reproducing a Drypoint by Albrecht Dürer (p. 855).

Further extracts from the Advent pastorals. The Council o f Ephesus and other matters (pp. 860-62).

NEWS AND NOTES f I ' 0 every household, both in our land and out of

1 it, The Tablet washes a Happy Christmas. Indeed, we are not ashamed to hope that it will be also a merry one. Grave and sober persons have lately said that a chastened happiness ought to be the limit o f our Christmastide pleasure this year, because o f our Fatherland’s troubles. But why ? A strong point in the oft-maligned English character is our knack o f making the best o f a bad job. If it be true that we take our pleasures sadly, it is no less true that we take our pains cheerily. During the Great War, which included four Christmases in its ghastly duration, millions o f young Britons contrived to be uproariously and genuinely merry and jo lly over

N ew S e r ie s . Vol. CXXVI. No. 4,180.

rough Yuletide fare, even in foul dugouts with death stalking them just outside. Indeed, Germans and Englishmen joined in playing football on some parts o f No Man’s Land during the Christmas of 1914. I f there could be a Merry Christmas in such conditions as those, there can be another in 1931 ; and we owe one to the children wherever we can pay the debt.

Happily the cost of living remains low. Those prophets who tried to make the blood o f the electors run hot against the National Government by predicting, on the eve of the General Election, that food and clothing would soon become frightfully dear ought to be (but are not) hiding their discredited heads. The pound sterling’s fall to little more than tw'o-thirds of its par value abroad has not been followed at home by any appreciable shrinkage in its purchasing power, from the housewife’s point of view. On the contrary, money goes a little further. Keeping up our habit of going in and out among all classes o f people, we ourselves have found this week that supplies o f fruit, both fresh and preserved, as well as edible birds, beasts and fishes, are even more abundant than last year’s and generally cheaper. Indeed, there is a danger, amidst all this plenty, of forgetting that more frugal habits will have to be formed, as soon as the holidays are over, if we are to pay our way.

Certain changes have impressed us while we have been moving about among the Christmas shoppers. The most gratifying of them is the good-tempered return to England’s old custom of family re-unions at Christmas. During the improvident years which lasted far too long, it became the custom for wellto-do families to disintegrate just before Christmas Eve and to remain separated until after the Epiphany. Some members of the household stayed at h om e ; others crossed the Channel and half Europe to find winter sports ; and the rest " dodged Christmas,” as they called it, in company with their own little cliques o f cynics. This year bids fair to show us an improvement which Catholics must encourage both by word and by example.