THE TABLET

y i W eekly N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v ie w

DUM V O B IS GRATULAMUR ANIM OS ET IA M ADDIMUS UT IN IN C ΠP T I S V E S T R I S CONSTANTES MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4, 1870.

V o l . 158. No. 4,768. L o n d o n , September 26, 1931.

S i x p e n c e .

Registered at tub General P ost Office as a Newspaper

New s and No t e s ................ Page 389 “ P r iè r e s I n s t a n t e s ” 393 The Catholic University

“ W eek s” a t Salzburg 394 F rom The Tablet of N inety

Years A g o ............................ 395 A11 Ex-Monk’s E x -E rra tum 395 Sermons fo r the Times . . . 396 “ The U n ity of the Fam ily ” 397 R e v ie w s :

Off the P r e m i s e s ................397 A 11 Ill-E quipped Anti-

D a rw in ite ................ 397

CONT

R e v ie w s ( Oontd.) :

Page

An Old, Old S tory . . . 398 Thomas H a rd y th rough

I ta lia n Eyes ................... 399 Books Received ................... 399 New Books and Music . . . 400 D eath of the B ishop of

Nottingham

400

Coming E v ents ................... 401 A Centenary in K orea . . . 401 The New Church a t Broad-

s ta irs ............................... 402

ENTS

Page

Correspondence:

Rome (O u r Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from ) ............................... 405 Ch e s s ............................................4 06 Catholics and National

H ealth In su ra n c e . . . 407 Et CiETERA............................... 408 Catholic Education Notes . . . 409 Obituary ............................... 410 O rd in a tio n a t Oscott . . . 410 Orb is T errarum :

E ngland, Scotland, and W ales ............................... 410 I r e la n d ............................... 411

Page

Or b is T err arum (Oontd.) :

Belgium ............................... 412 B r itis h H onduras . . . 412 China ............................... 412 F ran ce ............................... 412 G erm any ............................... 414 I ta ly ............................................ 414 J a p a n ............................... 414 P o la nd ............................... 414 South A frica ................... 414 Spain ............................... 416 Yugoslavia 416 Social and P ersonal . . . 416

NOTANDA

Perils from the East. Cardinal Bourne’s grave warning. His Eminence calls the Catholics of England and France to prayer (p. 393).

The Prayers for Russia, after Low Mass. A suggestion (p. 390).

Death of the Bishop of Nottingham. Monsignor Dunn’s fruitful work in the episcopate. A recent portrait (pp. 392, 400, 408).

“’ Old Catholics” at Vienna. The Tablet offers a good-tempered criticism of their Anglican associates (p. 391).

Peace. The Bishop’s sermon at Geneva, in its original French, for the twelfth assembly of the League of Nations (p. 396).

At Salzburg. The beginnings of a movement which may culminate in a Catholic University (p. 394).

“ Missing from its Home.” Strange disappearance of the Ex-Monk’s erratum-slip (p. 395).

The centenary celebrations in Korea. A story of persecution, martyrdom, and triumph (p. 401).

NEWS AND NOTES L AST week’s leading article in The Tablet delivered a warning to those of our fellow-citizens who were “ deluding themselves by taking it for granted that the crisis [was] overpast and the pound sterling permanently saved.” We confess, however, th a t we wrote those prudent words without expecting a speedy collapse of the pound. At the worst, we feared some anxious weeks, during which the abandonment of the Gold Standard might have to be quietly arranged. But on Sunday the thunderbolt fell from a sky in which there were still wide expanses of blue. The Stock Exchanges in Great Britain, and the Bourses of many countries whose finance is closely interwoven with our own, did not open the

N ew S e r i e s . Vol. CXXVI. No. 4,167.

next morning. As Black Monday wore away, telegrams arrived which were full of humiliation for those who have made a national totem of the British pound sterling. In New York, the pound was exchanged for dollars at a rate which meant a loss of more than three shillings out of every pound. I t is true that the exchange was far worse during the worst days of the Great War, when the pound sterling, which is normally worth a few pence under five dollars, fell to a little over three dollars in the U.S.A. ; but the War was the War. As for France, British residents and tourists found themselves last Monday unable to buy francs with sterling at any price, except in large financial centres where they succeeded in getting sixteen or seventeen shillingsworth of francs for each pound.

On the whole, our fellow-countrymen received calmly the announcement that not even a balanced Budget had availed to save sterling. There was very little recrimination ; and there were no panics at all in even one of the many thousands of banks which exist all over Great Britain. Optimists declare that this calm was the expression of admirable national fortitude and that it is the best omen for the future. Pessimists, on the other hand, tell us th a t we have lost our spirit. They say that we have become so meek and mild that our pride can never again be made to smart. Britannia no longer rules the waves and—so the pessimists affirm—she is willing to lay aside every other symbol of hegemony and to subside into pusillanimous decadence. We fear it is true that vast multitudes of our fellow Britons care very little about anything save sport, and th a t their tranquility this week has been nothing better than a dull notion that things will come right somehow without our needing to work much or to worry at all. We are persuaded, however, that the minority of earnest men and women is a remnant strong enough to save the State. If we could be carried back into the past, probably we should find that most of the people, in every epoch, have lacked a keen sense of responsibility and opportunity, while the destiny of our race has had to be carried forward towards fulfilment by a comparatively small