THE TABLET

N W e e k l y N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIHUS UT IN INCŒPTIS VESTRIS CONSTANTER MAN EAT IS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

Vol. 158. No. 4,761.

London, A ugust 8, 1931.

Sixpence.

R egistered at the General P ost Office as a Niw s p a p m

News and No t e s ................. 165 For Honest Protestants . . . 169 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years Ago

Page

170

Imaginary Law Reports— V 170 “ The Next P o p e ” . . . 171 “ Ex-Monk ” Stephen

Ouseley ............................ 171 Coming Events ................. 173 R eview s :

Ignatian Prayer . . . 173 The Science of the Saints 174 Education 174

CONTENTS

R eview s ( Oontd.) :

A Depression from Ice­

Page land ............................ 175 Books Received ................. 175 New Books and Music . . . 176 Pax Romana ................. 177 Grand Week at Ushaw . . . 177 Cardinal Bourne at New­

castle

178

Ch e s s ....................................... 178 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’ s Weekly Letter from) ............................ 181

The Cambridge Summer

Page

School ............................ 182 Et C/ETERA.................. 183 Catholic Education Notes 184 British Medical Association at Eastbourne ................. 184 Obituary ............................ 185 Letters to the Editor :

“ The Illusions of Dr.

Barnes ” .................. 186 Wanted— A Patron Saint 186 Orbis Terrarum:

England, Scotland and Wales ............................ 186

Orbis Terrarum (Oontd.) :

Ireland

Argentina

Belgium

China

France

Holland

Hungary

Italy

Nigeria

Palestine

Poland

Siam

Spain

Venezuela

Social and P ersonal .. 192

Page

187

187

188

188

188

190

190

190

190

190

190

192

192

192

N O T A N D A Many Conferences, at home and abroad. Some reports which must not be overlooked (pp. 177, 182, 184).

Wesleyans and Russia. Poor words from Dr. Addison and a dreadful letter from a layman in K ing’s Lynn (p. 167).

Russian butter. Tw o more reasons fo r leaving it severely and wholesomely alone (p. 166).

An appeal to honest Protestants. Are such things as “ Ex-M onk ” Ouseley’s inventions to go on for ever? (p. 169).

National Economy. W hy lower salaries and wages need not mean lower standards o f living (p. 165).

John Dryden. Some notes apropos o f the poet’ s tercentenary (p. 183).

Tw o functions in the North. Grand W eek at Ushaw (p. 177), and the golden jubilee year prizegiving at St. Cuthbert’s Grammar School (p. 178).

Concerning the matter o f Rex versus Smug and others. Another imaginary Law report by a legal contributor (p. 170).

The new headmaster o f the Oratory School (p. 183). ___________________________

NEWS AND NOTES I N good time, we remind holiday-makers that next Saturday will be the Feast of the Assumption, a great day o f obligation. To fit a Saturday morning Mass into vacation time-tables, especially into week-ends, will be awkward in many cases. But we are to get over difficulties ; not let them get over us. And, apart from the discharge o f our individual obligation, we may do much good by our cheerful attendance at the Assumption Mass in a seaside or other holiday resort. Among the strangers who wonder why we should be pouring in and out o f churches on a week-day morning there are sure

New Series. Vol. CXXVI. No. 4,160.

to be some who will want to know more about our Monday-to-Monday religion : and the story may have the happiest o f endings. But we have spoken above of “ cheerful ” attendance ; not of a grudging and sullen obedience to the Church’s rules. Gaudeamus omnes in Domino, diem festum celebrantes sub honore Marice Virginis, de cujus assumptions gaudent angeli.

Germany’s Bank Holiday, which began in July, ended on Wednesday last, August 5, when the banks again opened their doors for business. Up to the moment o f our writing these lines, the disasters prophesied b y both home and foreign pessimists have not come to pass. On the contrary, German citizens paid more money into the banks last Wednesday than they drew out. But Germany’s trials— and the world’s-— are not over. The strain on our own country during July was worse than the general public knew and it has left us weaker.

Not one moment too soon, our public men, both in politics and in the Press, are occupying themselves with National Economy. The experts who have been studying the problem, both in principle and in practical detail, are almost all agreed that the State must cut down its expenditure in many directions. It is to their credit that they have not quailed in presence o f that most unpopular, but most necessary of remedies, the reduction of salaries and wages. Nobody relishes what used to be playfully called “ the Irishman’s Rise ” ; because it is a shock to one’s pride, as well as a hurt to one’s purse. None the less, it has to be faced, and faced quickly.

So much harm is being done by unpatriotic speakers and writers who are trying to set tbe public against the idea of lower wages and salaries that it is the duty o f Christian newspapers to point out the moral aspects of the proposed reform. If it were true that capitalists and employers are trying to