THE TABLET

y l W eek ly N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w

D U M V O B I S G R A T U L A M U R A N I M O S E T I A M A D D I M U S U T I N I N C C E P T I S V E S T R I S C O N S T A N T E R M A N E A T I S

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

Vol. 158. No. 4,758.

Page

News and No t e s .............. 69 “ The Lictorian Banners ” 73 Some Catholic Associations of the Inns of Court . . . 74 July 18th, 1538 .............. 75 Books Received .............. 76 R eviews : A Colleague of Canning . . . 77

Outstanding Novels— L . . . 78 A Cul de Sac .............. 78 Something Lacking . . . 80 Mother C a b r i n i .............. 80 Irish N u n s ......................... 80 New Books and Music . . . 81

London, July 18, 1931.

Sixpence.

Registered at the General P ost Office as a Newspaper

CONTENTS

Page

“ I Was in P r is on ------- ” 82 The New Church at Northfields .................................... 83 Catholic Doctors and

Catholic Action .............. 83 To Geneva and to Nurem­

berg .................................... 83 Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ......................... 85 W i l l s .................................... 86 Et Ce t e r a .......................... 87 Catholic Education Notes . . . 88

Page

Catholic Record Society . . . 88 East London Sacrifices for

Catholic Education . . . 89 Letters to the Editor :

Catholics and World Peace 89 Wanted— A Patron Saint 89 Obituary ......................... 90 Catholic Union of Great

Britain ......................... 90 From The Tablet of Ninety

Years A g o ......................... 90 Orb is Terrarum:

England ......................... 91 Scotland ......................... 91 Wales . . . .............. 91

Orbis Terrarum (Gontd.) :

Ireland

Brazil

China

France

India

Indo-China ...

Italy

South Africa

Spain

Venezuela . ..

Coming Events

School Sports

Social and Personal 96 Ch e s s .............. 96

...

Page

92

92

92

93

93

93

,,, 94

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96

96

NOTANDA Fascismo persists in Totalitarianism. II Duce’s boast that all Italian boys and girls shall be drilled “ under the Lictorian banners.” A Tablet leaderwriter corrects his brother o f The Times (p. 73).

Our Lady o f Walsingham. T o -day’s sad anniversary (p. 75).

Is the present Government equal to the hard work confronting it? And could a Conservative Government succeed where Labour has failed? A suggestion (p. 69).

Spain’s Republican Cortes. The D raft Constitution and its prospects (p. 72).

Anglicanism in South A frica . A correspondent’s explicable mistake (p. 71).

For the holidays. A truly Catholic novel described and criticized (p. 78).

Death o f Protestant Sweden’s Primate. Some personal memorabilia (p. 70).

London lore. A glance at the Catholic associations o f the Inns o f Court (p. 74).

Church extension in Middlesex. A view o f the new church at Northfields, as yet uncompleted, which replaces a temporary structure (p. 83).

N EW S AND NOTES I N spite o f the Hoover Moratorium, this week began with a German financial panic which has spread through Central Europe. Stock Exchanges have been closed, famous banks have suspended payment, statesmen have been dashing about in aeroplanes, and finance has clashed harshly with politics. By the time these lines are published, there ought to be a change for the better ; but there may be a change for the worse.

Whatever happens, problems must arise for our own country which are too difficult for solution by

N ew S e r ie s . Vol. CXXVI. No. 4,157.

His Majesty’s present Ministers. In saying this we do not intend to disparage the Labour Party as such. What we mean is that the present Government has never been sustained by a clear majority in the House o f Commons and that therefore it has to subtract ever so much time and energy from grave public affairs, through its fear of hostile political combinations. Even if we had just now a Ministry of All the Talents, cordially united for the national welfare, the Ministers would require all their time and strength for their work. There is a growing feeling among serious people that a General Election would not do much for us and might even make matters worse. Coalitions, “ Business Governments,” non-political administrations and all such things have usually been found in the past either undesirable or impracticable : but it does not follow that the idea underlying them is hopelessly bad. If Labour suffered a big set-back after an appeal to the country and if the Liberals were reduced to a mere handful in the Commons, it would not follow that a Conservative majority could and would deliver us from our economic troubles. In short, the time has come for patriotic men and women to get outside their party skins and to think out some scheme under which factious politics might be restrained within the narrowest possible limits, the elbow-room thus gained being all given up to more flexible administration of the commonwealth on non-partisan lines. Now and again, journalists use one o f their favourite stock phrases when they tell us that " the House of Commons was at its best yesterday afternoon.” They employ this language only when the warring Parties have buried the hatchet for a brief space and have concurred in some course o f action for the general honour and welfare. The suggestion of this Note is that the rare “ best moments ” o f Parliament should be expanded into best days and perhaps even into best Sessions. We grant that it is easier said than done ; but, unless politicians honestly try to do it, they will soon lose what prestige they may have retained and some far more unusual experiment may suddenly be tried over their heads and against their wills.