THE TABLET A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER AND REVIEW

ESTABLISHED 1840 REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER

VOL. 172 No. 5138

LONDON OCTOBER 29th, 1938

SIXPENCE

IN THIS ISSUE

“NOT AGAINST FLESH AND BLOOD”

A Poem from Spain by Roy Campbell

THE PARTITION OF IRELAND: TWO VIEWS

(1) By Christopher Hollis (2) By J . B. M orton

HUNGARIAN ISSUES OF THE HOUR

TH E LAND, TH E JEW S , TH E NAZIS From O u r Central European Correspondent

THE NAZIS AND RELIGION IN AUSTRIA

AND SUDETENLAND Two Suppressed P asto ra ls of the Austrian Bishops

ALL SOULS’ DAY

By R. H . J . S teuart, S .J .

FO R E IG N BROADCAST TALKING AT RANDOM

PRO G RAM M E S

By D .W .

Full L ist o f Contents on page 548.

CHESS AND

C ROSSWORD

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK The French Radicals

The French senatorial elections have yielded no marked results. The figures are almost the same as last time, and the elections reflect the attitude of expectancy and hesitation which now marks the French political scene. I t is with the Radicals, M. Daladier’s party, that the major decisions rest at the moment, and their congress a t Marseilles holds the centre of the stage. The Radicals are in a difficult position. They are the quintessence of the political regime o f the Third Republic. In a peculiar sense they feel themselves its custodians. They embody its essential ideals of political equality and extreme economic inequality. They exist, as the regime exists, to secure for Frenchmen a regime under which they can amass their private fortunes. The Third Republic has proved the longest lived type of government in France since the Revolution, largely because it has achieved this reconciliation between the full language o f democracy and the full protection o f private ownership and private independence. It is well known that many of those who framed its constitution in the debates o f the ’seventies meant to prepare the ground for constitutional monarchy. They wanted the sort o f evolution which had made Louis Napoleon pass from the presidency o f the Second Republic to a throne, to repeat itself. They considered that the Second Empire, like the reign of Louis Philippe, brought back the throne to the degree o f being a support for, and not a threat to, the structure o f society they desired. The constitution was intended to steer a middle course, and to exclude the possibilities o f too much autocracy in the manner o f the F irst Empire, or o f too naked a reign of ephemeral politicians, taking short views for themselves and their friends and interests, in the tradition of the Directory. In the event, the presidential office in the Third Republic has only at times become practically important. The real ballast has been provided by the Senate, and the Senate has represented the intensely conservative financial interests which have really ruled France because their aims and ambitions have reflected, in the larger sphere, the aims and ambitions secretly cherished by the ordinary Frenchman. A “Directed Economy” for France ?

To the Left o f the Radical Party, with its tradition of thinking primarily about political issues like the disestablishment and discouragement of religion, there has grown up, from the French proletariat, the present Left, the Socialists under Blum, and the now considerable Communists, whose whole approach to politics is out of harmony with the Radicals and is primarily concerned with the standard o f living. Like the Liberals in England the French Radicals are divided. Many o f them feel the pull o f the Left, and care more for social legislation than for their old watchwords. But they are now faced with the growing emergence o f a challenge to all their root