THE TABLET A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER AND REVIEW

ESTABLISHED 1840 REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER

VOL. 172 No. 5126

LONDON AUGUST 6th, 1938

SIXPENCE

IN T i n s ISSUE

THE INTELLECTUAL TRAGEDY OF FRANCE

A Study of Political Conflict. By Bernard Fay MUSSOLINI v e r su s THE CESARS

An Editorial on Racialism

THE POLITICAL CRISIS IN THE U.S.A.

By Douglas Jerrold

AGRICULTURAL TRENDS IN EUROPE

A Survey of Achievement and Failure THE CATHOLIC SOCIAL GUILD

Full Report of the Summer School Full List o f Contents on page 164.

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK Changkufeng

The Spanish Nationalists in Catalonia

Fighting is still going on on the Russo-ManchurianKorean border. Of course sporadic fighting has been going on in that unhappy part of the world for some time without either side wishing to push their differences into a major conflict. The dispute about the Changkufeng Hill is certainly of much graver importance than any that have preceded it, because of the strategic importance of the territory in dispute. On the other hand there can be little doubt that a major conflict will be disastrous for both the Japanese and Russian regimes, and, if the politicians at Tokyo and Moscow are allowed to have their way, the matter will be certainly compromised. It is, however, far from certain how far the troops on either side are obedient to their nominal political masters. The Russian intention seems to be to make sufficient trouble for the Japanese in Manchukuo for it to be impossible for them to detach troops from this highly efficient army to assist the much less efficient Japanese troops in Southern China. Lord Runciman at Prague

There is but little that can be usefully said about the Czechoslovakian situation except to wish Lord Runciman all the success that may be possible. It would be folly to encourage high hopes of an easy settlement. The gap between what the Sudeten Germans demand and what Prague is prepared to concede, still seems quite unbridgeable. If a bridge can be found, whether by Lord Runciman or otherwise, it will be a cause of most heartfelt rejoicing. But it is more probable that the solution will only be one which the Sudeten Germans accept under protest, determined, like the pre-War Irish, to use the powers and votes granted to them in order to compel the concession of more—a solution which will still leave the situation extremely dangerous.

There does not seem the beginning of a sign of any issue in Spain. The fighting round Gandesa has shown that war in Catalonia is a different story from war elsewhere in Spain. Elsewhere it has been the claim —and on the whole a justified claim—of the Nationalists, that wherever they have advanced they have been welcomed by the people as deliverers and that there has been no opposition to them behind their own lines. It must be frankly admitted that they have met with a different welcome when they advanced into Catalonia, and by their own confession it was disaffection behind their own lines which was partly responsible for the necessity for a withdrawal before the attack on the Ebro. The Bulgarian Agreement

It is, however, a pleasure to be able to record that all the bad news of the week is greatly outweighed by the good news of the agreement of Salonika between Bulgaria and the Balkan Entente. The Bulgarians have as just grievances against the peace settlements as anybody, and it was open to them, had they wished, to keep the Balkans divided between small Powers, each anxious to enlist the assistance of a Great Power. No policy could have been more likely to have led to world-wide war. They have eschewed it. Standing together, the Balkan Powers are strong enough to make impossible their domination by any Great Power, and, doing so, they lessen, immeasurably, the chances of war. The “ Daily Herald’s ” Bank Holiday

In an interesting bank-holiday number, the Daily Herald comforts its readers with the large headline of "Europe Now Has Hope of Lasting Peace.’’ The headline and the front-page article that accompanies it are interesting, and greatly to the Herald's credit,