THE TABLET A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER AND REVIEW

ESTABLISHED 1840 REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER

VOL. 171 No. 5108

LONDON APRIL 2nd, 1938

SIXPENCE

IN T i n s IS SU E

CATHOLICISM AND THE NAZI MOVEMENT

An Editorial

THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN SPAIN

From 1800 to 1931. Concluded. By A. A. Parker

THE SECOND TEMPTATION OF OUR LORD

By Mgr. Ronald Knox

AUSTRIA

Events and Impressions

THE FRENCH CRISIS

From Our Paris Correspondent

Full List o f Contents on page 432.

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK The Nationalists’ Victorious Advance

The Nationalist drive to the Mediterranean continues at great speed, and without encountering any effective resistance. Lerida, the second city of Catalonia, is a point at which many roads converge, and its fall will further dislocate any attempts to move troops in front of Barcelona. Of equal importance is the Nationalist to Tortosa. When Tortosa falls, Madrid and Barcelona can only communicate by sea.

The Communist daily, l'Humanité, is pressing M. Blum’s new Government to intervene on the side of the Reds, on the pretext that France cannot afford to allow Germany or Italy to occupy strategic points on the Iberian peninsula. General Franco’s categorical assertion that “ Spanish independence and territorial integrity was not now, had never been, and would never in the future be threatened,’’ and his statement of the position as far as foreign aid to the Nationalists is concerned, should be a firm enough answer. But last Saturday M. Zyromski, a prominent leader of the S.F.I.O., M. Blum’s Socialist Party, made a direct appeal for intervention, incidentally revealing how much had already been done : “ Let us not mince our words,’’ he said. “ Our help and support is immediately necessary for Republican Spain. This support must be ' up to the measure of the circumstances. ’ Hitherto our help has never been 'u p to the measure of the circumstances’ ; it has always remained notably below it. Can it still remain so ? Is free trade and supply of arms sufficient ? It was yesterday ; but today it is not . . . This means war, you may say. I reply that, alas ! war is already there,

visible and tangible. ’’ When such speeches are made by leading members of the Premier’s own party, French journalists may well ask, as a leader-writer in the Temps asked last week : ‘‘When M. Blum said that he intended to ask the country for an increase of power, what did he mean, and what does he propose to do with it ? ” Crisis in France

With each day that passes, M. Blum’s position becomes more uncomfortable and hopeless. He returned to power in place of M. Chautemps because the Left Wing of the Popular Front would not tolerate the expedients recommended by the Chautemps Government to deal with the increasingly grave financial situation. M. Blum accordingly returned to power to face the same difficulties as his predecessor, while being banned from advocating his predecessor’s remedies. The Radicals and the Senate are quite as unwilling to let M. Blum have exceptional financial powers as the- Socialists were to give a similar free hand to M. Chautemps. The struggle between the two groups goes very deep, and expresses in the political arena the conflict between the old financial individualism and the new collectivist mentality. It is embittered, at the moment, by a cleavage, whose line runs down through the Radical Party, over French foreign policy. The present strikes are predominantly Syndicalist gestures, political and not economic, a kind of industrial sabre-rattling to keep the politicians up to the mark. Where the strikers have demanded active intervention in Spain, they have produced a counter-movement. The ex-soldiers’ organizations and the peasant organizations have