THE TABLET A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER AND REVIEW

VOL. 171 No. 5096

ESTABLISHED 1840 REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER

LONDON JANUARY 8th, 1938

SIXPENCE

IN TH IS IS SU E

CATHOLICS, ORTHODOX AND JEWS IN RUMANIA

DEMOCRACIES AND DICTATORSHIPS

An Editorial on President Roosevelt’s Message

ON RE-READING J. R. GREEN’S HISTORY

By Philip Hughes

SOME GERMAN POLEMICS FOREIGN BROADCASTS

On Cardinal Verdier’s Address

Teruel and Barcelona

Full List o f Contents on page 36.

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK The Snowbound Offensive

The China Trade

The mainly successful Nationalist drive to relieve Teruel is now expected to be developed into a drive towards Castellon and the coast if the weather makes operations possible. M. Georges Rotvand Writes in the Journal de Genève that the success of the Government’s original surprise attack was due to its Russian commanders. Spaniards on both sides assumed that heavy snow made operations impracticable, but if Russians thought like that, their military activities through history would have had but little scope. The surprise was genuine, but the Government troops, though they got into Teruel, never became completely masters of it, and they are now in danger of finding their retreat cut off. It has been a characteristic of the whole war that attacks have often reached the outskirts of towns without being pressed home, because houses and streets make natural defences in the machine-gun age. Teruel as a frontier town had been attacked seriously on some eleven previous occasions. Huesca, Oviedo, were other towns where Government troops reached the outskirts and then found the defence too strong. The upshot, for most observers, is that the Government have gambled and lost in Teruel. For months there has been so much talk about the new People’s Army, and the shouting was so loud in the first phase of success in this engagement, that * the anti-climax has been marked, and the operation was undertaken from the first primarily for its effect upon morale. M. Jouhaux, the French Trade Union leader, has been in Government Spain, frankly explaining why France has not done more for his listeners. He explained that France could do nothing without England, and England was a country with divided sympathies and an unfriendly Government.

Nineteenth-century Englishmen encountered rather few physical adventures, had many adventures of the mind, and of the pocket, for they made their money have their adventures for them. A great trade was built up in every corner of the world: a trade made possible by the willingness of merchants and investors to take risks. Those risks were envisaged all the time as primarily economic. Even in Central America, where political disorder was a byword, it was the long-range economic possibilities, the presence of minerals or of oil, which really settled the great decisions to invest. In the Far East the main problem was to cajole or force the Chinese to play their assigned part in the financial and commercial scheme. Today the China trade is directly threatened with an outspokenness which is new. One of the recent recruits to the Japanese Government, Admiral Suetsugu, has given two interviews to important Japanese journals, in which he has put into words a thought a long time cherished behind impassive Oriental countenances, that the white man, the European or the American, has no place on the mainland of China, and must go. He has spoken openly of possible war with Great Britain. The declaration is in no sense official. The official attitude continues all the time to be one of measured language, formal correctness, and an unwillingness to proclaim large views or programmes. But what Admiral Suetsugu says is also the moral to be drawn from the increasing demands of the Japanese authorities on the International Settlement at Shanghai, where a Japanese censorship is now being installed.