THE TABLET A W E E K L Y N E W S P A P E R AND R E V IE W

VOL. 171 No. 5097

ESTABLISHED 1840 REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER

LONDON JANUARY 15th, 1938

SIXPENCE

IN THIS ISSUE A L E G IO N A R Y S P EAKS

By ROY CAMPBELL An Epic Poem of the Spanish War B E A T I F IC A T IO N An Historical Account of the Processes

By HERBERT THURSTON, S.J.

T H E R E U N IO N O F

C H R IS T E N D O M

The Church Unity Octave Starts This Week

S E V E N T E E N T H C E N T U R Y

A R T

The Burlington House Exhibition

Full List o f Contents on page 68.

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK The Value of Teruel

The position at Teruel is, for the moment, apparently stabilised. The Nationalist lines come up to the outskirts of the straggling town, but the heart of the town remains in the hands of the Government troops. They captured it by a surprise coup and they have not been dislodged. In a small way, the position at Teruel is like that at Madrid. Further advance through the outskirts involves a kind of house to house fighting, in which the defence has huge advantages. This real, but local, Government success has been absurdly exaggerated. I f Teruel had ever played a big part in the Nationalist strategy it could not have been surprised. It was because it was a quiet part of the line, not a centre for the concentration of men and material, that it was open to sudden attack in mid December. Its chief value to the Barcelona authorities is abroad, to give colour to their contention that the initiative has passed to them ; and that is no more true than it was six weeks ago. The pretence is still kept up that the Nationalist Army is mainly foreign, though now the emphasis has been shifted from the Italians to the Germans. All visitors will be taken to Teruel and it will be made as much a household word as Guernica by skilful propagandists. But the abiding facts remain. The simple truth is that Nationalist Spain has a population of some fourteen million, nearly double the population in Catalonia and Valencia and Carthagena. Both sides have conscription, but relatively the Red authorities are much more dependent on importing both officers and men ; and this truth will become more apparent as the war proceeds. The Japanese Decision whether to call a halt or commit the empire to a full forward policy in China, and that it decided for the forward policy. The Councils are rare meetings, and all the previous ones have been preliminary to a formal declaration of a war, in 1894 against China, in 1904 against Russia, in 1914 against Germany.

If the Japanese go forward now, it is largely because they know that the British Navy will be very much stronger next year than this. They know, in short, that none of the European Powers are at all anxious to send troops to the Far East, and the existence of the RomeBerlin-Tokio axis does not mean that either the Germans or the Italians are to be allowed a privileged footing or a restraining voice in Japanese councils. Germany and Japan have been closely associated these many years past, but German feelers for mediation have been rather curtly waved aside. It may reasonably be deduced that Japanese statesmen do not expect war to break out in the near future in Europe, that they judged the present moment of partial tension, the uneasy atmosphere of rearmament and divided sympathies over Spain, as providing as good a moment as is likely to present itself for an unimpeded Japanese advance. If they thought a major war likely in Europe, they would have every inducement to wait till it came, and then go ahead on the mainland of Asia. By the same reasoning, they apparently discount the idea that the Soviet will grow much weaker through internal rottenness in the near future. No Trade Boycott

The Imperial Council summoned by the Mikado issued no decisions, and the Japanese are notoriously reticent about their aims, immediate or remote. But all the precedents of Japanese history suggest that the meeting was o f great importance, that it had to decide

We are glad that in Labour circles the talk of a trade boycott of Japan has been rebuked by Sir Walter Citrine. This kind of pressure is one which is very popular among people who want to impose their will without any particular exertion or risk. A much sounder line of policy is to establish the principle that trade is never to be interfered with for political reasons. The attempts at economic sanctions have driven nations