38 OPINIONS

48 A HYPOTHESIS OF RESISTANCE

ON JARGON by Pablo Larios

“At first we would complain to writers about the invasion of artspeak. Over time, though,

it became clear that it was more than just artspeak. It was as though the forces of niche thinking itself had become too strong. We never found out whether there was

such a thing as a ‘general audience,’ either. Perhaps it never existed. We gave up.”

A LECTURE ON UNDETECTABILITY

by Cally Spooner “The method operates by supporting the hundreds of languages through which

a child communicates, and through

which their intellect emerges. A small selection of those languages here:

singing, balancing, stick handling,

digging, dancing, jumping, den construction, knot tying, painting,

pretending to be a bird.”

56 SURVEY

94 MONOGRAPH

MRINALINI MUKHERJEE

(A) OVERGROWTH

Noopur Desai, Emilia Terracciano, and Murtaza Vali in conversation “[Mukherjee] is is best known for awe-inspiring effigies woven out of dyed

hemp rope, whose unruly forms and enfolded surfaces blur the botanical and the bodily, presenting a singular iconography that synthesizes

cues from India’s many rich artistic pasts with uncannily prescient intimations of dystopian futures overrun by the more-than-human.”

(B)

LESS A THING THAN THE TRACE OF A MOVEMENT

by Skye Arundhati Thomas

“The sex suggested by plant life is ambiguous, androgynous, sometimes

formless, and occasionally evasive, like the nature of desire itself. Plants grow into their environments; they can be invasive and eat through

materials as much as they can nourish them, encircling, enshrining. Flowers turn toward the sun, wink in the light. Plants release their scents

at special hours. Botanical life is laced with an undeniable yearning— a desire to thrive, to grow, to move toward light, to swell out of confines.”

TOUCH, GAZE, MOTION, MEMORY: ON TWO RECENT VIDEO WORKS

BY PENG ZUQIANG

by Travis Jeppesen “If these films at first come across as “difficult,” Peng knows full well that for those seeking clear-cut

answers, art is not the place to go. It is rather a place for asking questions. As such, these works

withhold as much as they give—and it is in this withholding that Peng’s idiosyncratic poetics

reside.”