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rbpa lnlemalaonal Business Pr0$s Ass0ciates

11 DECEMBER 1969 VOL 131 No 3852

Edltor

Chi.t Ar.lirrn Edhor

A!.irtant Edhor Tcchdal Edto:

Sport Editot

Art Cditol Fmturoi Edhor

Editori.l

FCTCR GANNIER LEOTARO AYTON STUABT BLADOf, GEOFFREY P. HQWAiD, BSclEns). ACGt ITTES IRELA'IID LIOilEL BURRELL flARTilt LEW|A

WABREN ALLPORT JEFFFEY DANI€LS. B.Sc MARTIN OWERS DAVID THOMAS

madbrd Editor EDWARO EVES

MetEhoitor Ortrco gpccial Cofidbrtor.

HAROLD HOLT, AMIMI. AMAET RONALD BAR(ER ROGER HUNTINGTON, ASAE IDetrcil) EOIN YOUNG /Sporil

Mamgirle Dlmtor H. il. PBIAULX, MAE

Edhorial DlEctor MAUnICE A. SMfTH, OFC

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MAIN FEATURES

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SAMPLING TWO RAC BALLY WINNERS 2 SUSPENSION AND HANDLING: PART 2 6 'AUTOTEST: FORD CORTINA 11OO 10 THE STOBY OF PETROT 16 VAUXHALL'S NEW PROVING GROUND 27 AUTOCODE: ITS APPLIGATION TO THE BBITISI{

LEYLANO RANGE

FBOM MUDLARK TO MANUFACTURER 34

Supp 1

REGUIAR ITEMS THE SPORT

STBAIGHT FROM THE GRID

DISCONNECTED JOTTINGS

NEWS AilD VIEWS

TBADE AITD INDUSTRY

OETBOIT NOTEBOOK

NEW PBODUCTS

COBRESPOTTDENCE

IIIEW CAB PRICES Last pages before back cover

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'We rdgrol thot rh6 Autor€st of th€ M6zda 12OO schodulod for thi6 i$g!d hss hrd to b6 pslponod until a l6ter dotg it tho € xprers roquesl o, tho British concossioeiros. We apoloolp fo, ony distppOinrment caussd to rsd.Jers. rhroush ilo lault Of @r own.

NEXT WEEK'S ISSUE FEATURES

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Publishod by ILIFFE TBANSPOFI P{JBIICATIONS LTO.. Oor$! Hou&, Sramlord Sr6!t. tdrron S.E.l. lT.lephond: 01-928 3333. felegftms: Iolrr.' Aut@ar lli(gpres 25137 l-qdonr. BRANCH OFFICES: Coventry,.8.lO Corpor.ilon Srreol ffal.prordi Cov..try 26210,r 8irhi.reh.m. 40l Lyntoh H@sc, Wal$t, R@d. Birminelrsm, 22b fabphw:O21 Eleh{iold 4839)" (|els\: llifiop@s. Birmingham 338O8O}. M.ncho8t6r. $tsthim Hquw, Tctbor R@d, Strotlord. Morch$tor M32 OPE (T.lopho@. 06l-872 4211). Gl50g@, 2-3 Clri.mom Gardons, Glaso@ C.3. lfelaphons: O41.332 3792:041-322 8006,. Bdrrol, 'L ElmdoloRod, Irisrol 8lTalophono: griBiol21491-2/3).Slb3c.iprionEras:liffia, 1yoar fB l5s; Ov6rear.'l y6srf8 158,3y€r.sf22 5r:USAonlC6nadr, I ye6r$22,3yoBE t65, Crrrrra of addrots-,,ledsa noro that lour msks ndi6 iF roquicd logolhor with rhc roturn ol ! wropor booring thp old addrsss. Rsgrsterod ,t tho Gorcral PGf Offi@ as I Newsprper. 55@sd clrs privllcoss rlthori!€d al Now York. N-Y. (', IPC Budne$ PBss Lrd, 1969. Pc.mb.i@ to Eprcduco illurtrarions and loltorproca inlhisidrnrlconbogBntodonly ualder wnn6n agoomsnt. Briot rxtracts o. conmonla may b€ fred9 with duo aclnowlcdgEmsnt.

To Build-or to Stagnate n MBITIOUS and futuristic plans for road construction A in London, to cope witfr ine traffic of the 1980s and beyond. have been drawn up by the GLC; and on some parts of the scheme work is already well advanced. But now the noisy voices of small opposition groups, tending to sound much bigger than they are, begin to threaten the whole project. Londoners will soon have to decide whether they want the ambitious plans to go ahead, or whetherthey would prefer to see the capital stagnate under the chaos of ever-mounting traffic congestion.

Among the opposition is the "Motorway Action Group" (should it not be "anti-Action Group"?) led by DouglasJay, and a book entitled Motorways in London has been written by Michael Thomson, attacking the GLC's Ringway proposals. Last week a Press conference organized by the British Road Federation and led by Lord Redmayne. pointed out the folly of the arguments that have been put up against moving with the times and building the roads so urgently needed; and the whole dispute has now been brought into the open. Lord Redmayne reminded his audience that Mr. Jay was "known to be passionately anti-motorist, anti-road transport and anti-roads". A forceful counterattack against Lord Redmayne's criticisms of the book lost much of its effect when the speaker was asked to give his name and revealed himself as none other than Michael Thomson, the author of the book under discussion.

Rational thinking is needed; no one in Britain wants to see fine historic buildings pulled down to make way for urban motorways. or ruthless demolition of good property. But these matters are safe-guarded as far as possible in the GLC plans. Wherever practicable, the proposed Ringways run over poor property or on railway land throughout much of their length. lf one walks along the Western Avenue extension, now nearing completion, and looks over the side 6t the surrounding property, the thought is not that so many homes have been demolished; but rather regret that a few more tumble-down terraced houses with neglected pockethandkerchief back yards were not cleared away at the same time and their occupants rehoused in better conditions.

Motor traffic-commercial as well as private-will continue to grow for many years yet, and to turn a blind eye and not cater for the massive increase in vehicle traffic would be madness. Other cities have been rebuilt; London is running late already. Where would we be now if this attitude had been taken in 1955 when thefirstplansfor a London-Yorkshire motorway were announced ? There is certainly no comfort in the Thomson solution-restraint on traffic and subsidies for public transport which the BRF say could cost f2OO million a year. This approach ignores completely the road needs of industry and commerce. The growth in lorry and van traffic is the big problem forwhich the GLC road plans have been prepared.