tl JATUARY 10OO vor 128 No.3752

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Spotn EdtE A..Lfittf.ohdo.l Edioi

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Mldrnd Edhor

An Gditot Arsiclrnt M.nchx!.r Olfcc

Sprclal ConHbutorr itin.glrre Olr.ctol

IIIAUBICE A. sMITH, DFC PETEB OATT{IEi IEOT{ARO AYTON STUART ELAOOI'I rilt{E8 rnEl.AxD OEOFFSEY HOWANO,

SSdEng). ACCI, GlM.chE

JOHN DAVEY GRAHAM ROBSON. MA(Axon) MAR'IN LEWIS MICHAEL SCARLETT WARREN ALLFORT

EOYI'A8O EVES

HOWARD VYSE JOHN HAWKINS

HAROLD HOLT. AMIMI, AMAET

RONALD BARKER ROGIR HUNTINGION, As,,.E Oefi it) EOIN YOUNG (Spon)

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MAII{ FEATURES CHANGE OF SCENE HOTIDAY ABROAD? WHY NOT? OVER YOU GOI_CROSSING TABI.ES AUTOCAR ESCAPE ROUTES TEST: $IMCA 1lfl) HIGHWAYS AND BYWAYS OF GERMANY NEW MERCEDES RANGE SWEDISH RALLY NEW ZEALAND GP AUTOSPEED'68 SHOW SOUTH AFRICAN GP

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THE SPORT

NEW PROOUCTS

STRAIG}IT FROM THE GRID

PICVYEEK

NEWS AND VIEWE

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l{EW CAR PRICES Last pagos before back cover

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62

68

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IIEXT WEEK'S ISSUE FEATURES-P. 64

COVER: Atnni, near Amalfi, Salerno Peniruuls, ltaly. Photogrsphy: Douglas Dickim.

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EDUCATENOT PUNISH

lT could have happened to any of us. A longer-than-expected business appointment, a scramble back to the parking meter, and out into the maelstrom of traffic. . . a slowcrawl through the traffic jams of London's Parliament Sguare, and a quick dash across the open spaces of Westminster Bridge, the mind preoccupied by thoughts of an article to write. This dash, however. must have been a mite too quick for suddenly, from nowhere, there was the white authority of a Triumph motorcycle. An immaculate gauntlet signalled us to the kerbside, and we wound down the window with a sinking feeling.

"Now what have you gained by all that, Sir?", a soft Scots accent enquired.

"Well ... nothing really, Isuppose,officer". "But I was there all the time, you know. You should have looked in your mirror".

"Yes . . . well, you must have been in my blind-spot". "There's no blind spot, Sir-you just didn't look. Three times, you know, and you lose your licence. Use your mirror next time. Good afternoon, Sir".

This is precisely the sort of attitude which should be fostered between the police and the motorist. We returned to the office in a glow of good humour towards Authority. determined not to be so preoccupied in future. The motorist is seldom a criminal, and he will respond far, far better to this sort of approach than to rough treatment when he makes a human error.

Only recently, Lord Chesham, executive vice-chairman of the RAC, outlined the three priorities in making Britain's traffic flow more smoothly, happily and safely. They were: better roads and traffic engineering; extensive driver education in schools; and a greater use of traffic police, particularly "courtesy cops". To bring home this last point, Lord Chesham referred to a 20 per cent reduction in road accidents achieved by a West Country "courtesycop" experiment during 1965, a figure which has just been released after constant badgering by the RAC.

An experience such as ours does more than engender a spirit of co-operation with the police. lt is also a part of theeducation programme (in our case, perhaps a "refresher") which Lord Chesham has called for. Driving instruction in schools should be one of the M inister's first priorities, and the RAC themselves are to be congratulated for having more than 400 Junior Driver courses already in progress. What's more, basic theory would even help pedestrians to move in greater safety, through a clearer understanding of the driver's problems and limitations.